Wednesday, September 30, 2015

DNA to the Rescue

Looking into the camera, there was a faint hint of a smile on her face. Dressed in a fashionable suit, her hair was pulled up under a stylish hat with a large plume. Sitting beside her was a man equally well dressed, sporting a double breasted suit, and a hat cocked slightly on his head. This couple appeared to be a little better off than many of my ancestors. Who were they and what was the occasion?
Carl C. Fricks, Faucett, Genealogy, Family History, DNA, Chattanooga, Tennessee
Carl Fricks and Wife
(original in my possession)

Once again, a simple picture from my Grandma's suitcase would take me on an adventure as I sought to learn more about the identity of the people captured in the photo.

On the back of the picture was written, "Carl Fricks and his wife."  In addition, as a standard part of the photo, it read "Pickard's Photos, 820 Market Street, Chattanooga, Tennessee. CLOSED ON SUNDAYS. This style, 4 for 25 cents."  Simple enough? Well the problem was, I had no idea who Carl Fricks was.

I discovered the picture years ago and after a failed effort to learn who Carl was, I set him aside to work on later. This was long before the onslaught of online databases that are now available and so I turned to the Fricks message boards on Rootsweb and GenForum seeking anyone with connections to a Carl Fricks.  I found a few individuals searching the Fricks family, but no one was exactly sure who Carl was.  Over time and with many other projects to work on, I forgot all about "Carl Fricks and his wife."

Enter DNA!  Recently a DNA test at Ancestry led me to a new cousin and with it a renewed interest in Carl Fricks. I initiated the contact with my DNA match and indicated that I had discovered both the familiar names of Faucett and Fricks in her tree and told her that my great grandmother was Sarah E. Faucett and I was curious about her Fricks family.

She was unsure of how we connected, but shared that she had an Emma Faucett who married a Ramsey Fricks but she was unsure who Emma's parents were. My tree didn't have either Emma or Ramsey.  It would take a little digging to figure out who Emma was.

With what she knew about her Emma, she began the quest to find Emma's parents and it didn't take long. With some research it became apparent that the Martha Ann Emmeline Faucett in my tree and the Emma Faucett in her tree were one and the same. Martha Ann Emmeline Faucett. With that line up of names it is no wonder that without really focusing on her, neither of us had made the connection.

Emma was born the 28th of October 1856 in Chapel Hill, Orange County North Carolina. She was the third child and second daughter of James Merritt Faucett and Elmina Bowers. By 1860 the Faucett family was living in Lafayette, Walker County, Georgia.

Emma married Ramsey Fricks about 1879, likely in Walker County, Georgia,  as both of their families were living there and Ramsey and Emma can be found there on the 1880 census.

So just how did Carl Fricks fit in and why did I have a picture of him? It would take a little more digging to find his story.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved



Tuesday, September 15, 2015

"Old Mag"

I remember loving to watch the cartoon "Heckle and Jeckle."  The two talking magpies were constantly creating trouble and their antics always made me laugh.

If you've forgotten the rascally duo or have never seen the cartoon, I found a compilation of some of their cartoon antics here.

I am not sure if there weren't any magpies where I grew up or if I was just oblivious to them, but I never remember having them around. But I do remember after a move to a new state that I was surprised to learn that the annoying birds who made a daily ritual of stealing our dog's food and then taunting him with it were the very birds who had made me laugh as a child.

Apparently magpies can be found in Colorado because in her autobiography, Olive E. Faucett Christensen shared an experience she and her cousins, Orson and Heber Ganus, had with a magpie. At the time the orphaned twins were living with their cousins.




According to Olive, the twins Orson and Heber robbed magpie nests and broke the eggs. I am not sure why they thought that was fun, but I've long since given up trying to figure out little boys. Apparently one day when the two boys were out looking for eggs to break, they found a baby magpie and decided to bring it back to the house. Orson, Heber and Olive put the little bird in a box and kept him in the house as a pet. The three kids would spend time gathering worms and feeding the little bird. As it grew, Olive said it began to make weird noises, but it was gentle and stayed in the house and the kids decided it was a great pet to have around. They called the bird "Old Mag."

Olive's mother must have been a very patient woman to have allowed a magpie to live in their home. Knowing what I do about magpies, I can imagine not only the mess the bird must have made, but the mischief it must have caused as they seem prone to take things and to torment. But apparently those weren't the only issues to be concerned about. Olive recorded that with time their little pet became a lot less gentle. In Olive's words:
"As it grew older, it sorta got mean, its tail never did grow out and when it started to talk it would ruffle up its feathers and if it could get to your bare hand it would sneak up when you weren't looking, sock its bill down in your flesh as hard as it could, then step back and laugh and just shake all over like it was tickled to death. It loved a bare foot or elbow."
I would think that might be a good time to send the bird on its way, but apparently even its meanness didn't persuade the kids to get rid of her. It would appear that Old Mag was just as attached to the kids as Olive indicated that the grouchy pet was in and out of doors, free to do as she chose and she chose to stay.

Olive shared that one day Old Mag messed with the wrong guy when she bit Orson really hard and he hit her with a stick. She said that they kept her for a long time after that, but one day she disappeared and they never knew what became of her. Maybe Old Mag had had enough or just maybe.....someone else had.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

The Day the Hair Ran Out

I remember all too well an experience I had my freshmen year of college when a group of boys from the nearby dorms asked me and my roommate if we could cut hair. We told them sure we could and to come on over. Why either of us said such a thing, I am not sure because neither of us had the faintest idea how to cut men's hair. At the time I do remember thinking it couldn't be that hard.

genealogy, family history, story, family, Sanford Colorado, Orson Ganus
My roommate had at least watched her brothers get their hair cut a few times, so it was decided that she would be the authority and we would sit the guys in chairs side by side and I would watch what she was doing and mimic it.

The appointed time arrived and not one or two, but a handful of young men from the boys' dorm showed up. We set two chairs side by side and a guy plopped down in each chair.

I cringe, knowing that neither of us had hair cutting scissors. It only got worse because she got a guy with regular hair and I got a guy with extremely thick curly hair. The same method did not work on both heads of hair.

I don't remember the specifics of what happened when I was done or what was said, but maybe that's a blessing. What I do remember is that  I avoided that guy for a very long time afterwards. I can only imagine the conversation that went on in the boys' dorm that night. Not surprisingly, no one ever asked us to cut their hair again.

Apparently I am not the only one who was naive enough as a young girl to think that just anyone could cut hair. One of the funniest stories I came across in Olive E. Faucett Christensen's autobiography is a similar story involving my grandfather's twin, Orson Ganus. Olive shared the following experience:
"Now I want to tell one on Orson and I.  He had a heavy head of hair almost black and wavy. He was really getting shaggy.  I had watched people cut hair so I suggested I cut his hair. He said okay. We never said anything to Mamma, but got out by the house, kinda out of sight. I got my sissors and went to work on him. I cut for quite a while but it didn't seem to be shaping up like I thought it would so I'd size him up, cut some more here, then it needed something on the other side or in the back. I still whacked a little, by now I was getting a little worried. I began to wonder what I was going to do when the hair ran out. I was still clipping a little but feeling smaller and smaller until I didn't feel larger than a midget. I began to wonder what the haymen would say and what Papa would say. I quit cutting his hair and began to talk good to Orson and asking him to stay away from the dinner table and I'd bring his dinner to him. So he hid out at noon but we had to tell Mamma, she couldn't help but laugh because he looked a fright. That was one time I was glad hair could grow out."
Orson Merritt Ganus, Family History, Genealogy, family story, Sanford Colorado
Orson Ganus with unknown child,
Orson maintained a thick head of hair most of his life
Generously shared by great grand-daughter, Amy Moss

We've all had our bad hair days, but I can only imagine how Orson felt the following day when he faced the other men and boys in the hay fields. Although hair thankfully does grow back, Orson likely remembered that hair cut for a long time and the day the hair ran out.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Boxing and Crying

Those who have been following my blog are probably well aware that my grandpa, Heber Monroe Ganus, was orphaned at a young age.  Being a pivotal point not only for my grandpa but for his descendants as well, it is a point of reference for so many of my stories here.  If you haven't been following, you may want to read a little about the brothers and what happened here and here.

Because grandpa was orphaned and lived in several homes, we know little about his early life, so finding a few recollections of his childhood, no matter how brief, is a blessing. I found some stories about my grandpa and his brother Orson in a most unexpected place.

family history, genealogy, Sanford Colorado, Alamosa Colorado, Faucett, Ganus, orphan
Ernest and Heber 
On a recent visit to Brigham Young University (Go Cougars!) I visited their library and decided to take a look at an autobiography of Olive Elmina Faucett Christensen who lived in Alamosa, Colorado. I didn't know anything about Olive because I haven't worked much on my Faucett line, but knowing that my great grandmother was a Faucett and that she had lived in the Alamosa area for a time and knowing that her mother's name was Elmina, I was sure there was a link between her and Olive. I hoped that maybe there would be some mention of their ancestry, but was delighted to find instead a few stories that no governmental record can provide. This find underscores the value of learning all that you can about extended family. You never know what other treasures you might find in the process.

When Grandpa Heber's parents died, he and twin Orson and their older brother Ernest remained in Oklahoma for a time with their father's family but a year later went to Colorado to live with their mother's family. Orson went to their mother's brother, Thomas, Heber went to her brother Alfonzo, and Ernest went to Sally's oldest sister, Mary Haggard.  Both Thomas, Alonzo and Mary lived in Sanford so, although the brothers were split up, they lived relatively close to each other. Olive was Thomas' daughter and Orson became like a brother to her.

Olive's autobiography [1]  is a wonderful rambling of memories from her childhood as she recalls everything from how they made their beds, to milking cows and raising chickens as well as local events such as dances and ball games. While her book is difficult to find, if you would like a peek into life in rural Conejos County Colorado in the early part of the 20th century, locating a copy to read is worth the effort. I will be sharing several of her recollections of Orson and Heber over the next few blog posts.


In one account, Olive provided a brief look into what became a regular evening activity for Orson and Heber. Olive shared:
"One time Papa got Orson some boxing gloves for Christmas, things really got going then. Heber would come down from Uncle Fon's and everybody would get them to boxing.  Heber was a little tougher than Orson, but they would really box. Orson would hit and cry and hit and cry.  Then as the kids grew up they got a larger set of boxing gloves and boxing went right on down the line.  After supper men and boys would get out in the yard and box."

Other than the crying part, the story warms my heart.  It's good to know the boys got together in the evenings and "played," which in this case meant boxing each other's ears. Hopefully between the tears, there was also laughter and bonding. Because it became a repeated event and they later got larger gloves in order to continue the activity, I tend to think it was something they enjoyed doing together.


Orson Ganus, Heber Ganus, twins, orphans, Southern Colorado, boxing
The twins
Orson and Heber Ganus 

[1] Autobiography of Olive E. Faucett Christensen, written January through December 1957, Artcraft Printers, Alamosa, Colorado


Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved