Showing posts with label Ganus Rebecca. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ganus Rebecca. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Let's be perfectly clear

The picture didn't seem that bad. Yes something had apparently been spilled on it and yes, it wasn't very clear, but it was a picture! A picture of Samuel Solomon Lee and Rebecca Gainus ---my 2nd great grandfather's sister. I was so happy to get a copy of the picture, I guess I looked beyond its apparent poor condition. I didn't know much about photo restoration and didn't realize how much better it could look with a little help.



399Retouch, photo restoration, Ganus, Samuel Solomon Lee, familysearch, ancestry


I once again used 399Retouch to restore the photo and was very pleased with the results..




Rebecca Gainus was born in 1836 and was the daughter of James Ganus and Elizabeth McCluskey. She married Samuel Solomon Lee in 1853 in DeKalb County, Georgia. He was born in 1824 in South Carolina. Together they raised 10 children. You can read more about them at this blog post: Gurganus, Ganus, Ganues and Gaines--What?

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2016, All rights reserved

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Gurganus, Ganus, Ganues and Gainus--What?


imageNestled in the woods near Shadinger Lake, just a couple of miles outside of Carrollton, Georgia, is Tallapoosa Primitive Baptist Church.  The cemetery lies beside the church and is the final resting place for many who once gathered there as family and friends to worship and socialize.  It is there that Rebecca Ganus Lee is buried alongside her husband Samuel Solomon Lee and many of their children.

Rebecca Gainus was the fifth child and third daughter of James and Elizabeth (Gur)Ganus.   Born in 1836, she was ten years younger than her brother John Monroe Ganus who was my third great grandfather. Interestingly enough, her father shortened their surname from Gurganus to Ganus around 1840, and while most of his descendants spell their surname Ganus, some chose other spellings. Rebecca and her descendants spell their surname as Gainus and her brother Jackson and his descendants spell it Ganues.

image“Rebecker” grew up outside of Fayetteville, Georgia and as a child, she likely worked alongside her sisters Mary, Margaret, and Martha, as they helped their mother Betsy.  Girls generally helped their mothers with household duties such as cooking, cleaning and washing clothes, in addition to other chores such as feeding the chickens and light farm duties. Census data implies that Rebeca could read and write, so whether she attended school or was taught at home, she received some education. 

On 30 October 1853, at the age of 17, Rebecca married Samuel Solomon Lee in DeKalb County, Georgia. and it was there that they began their life together.  Samuel farmed and Rebecca managed the household and cared for their children.  Typical of the times, Samuel and Rebecca had a large family to feed and care for, but large families were a blessing in many ways as they worked together and supported each other in every aspect of life.  Samuel and Rebecca eventually settled in Carroll County, Georgia a little over 60 miles from Dekalb County where they had married.

At twenty-five years old, Rebecca had buried several babies and was caring for their five children when husband, Samuel Solomon Lee, enlisted with the 63rd Regiment Company C on 27 November 1862.  I marvel at the endurance of the women of that era.  Rearing a large family was not an easy task at any period of time, but caring for the children, the home and the farm, while a husband was away at war was a particularly difficult and demanding undertaking that required a great deal of inner fortitude and determination.  In addition many families lived in constant fear of the enemy troops who continually passed by and through their farms.

The war went longer than any of them could have imagined and the cost to lives and property was high.  Rebecca’s brother became one of the casualties of that cruel and devastating war and several other brothers never fully recovered.  She was one of the fortunate ones, however, because Samuel did return home. Together Rebecca and Samuel resumed their life through lean times, raising their children and farming.  They added three more children to their family and lived out their life in Carroll County, Georgia where some of their descendants live today. Their family consisted of Ann T., Roena J., Leonidas, John Franklin, James Marshall, William Thomas, Charles Mentor, Tobeus A., and Emma E. Lee.

On 10 October 1889, at the age of 53, Rebecca passed away and was buried in the Tallapoosa Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery in Carroll County, Georgia.  Samuel lived an additional eleven years and died on 16 Nov 1900.  He was laid to rest beside Rebecca.

image
Samuel Solomon Lee and Rebecca, along with their children, spouses and a grandchild.



All pictures were  generously shared by descendent, Margie Dietz. 

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2013

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Piecing Together Their Lives - Part 1

imageWe all have them.  Those individuals in our family tree that seemingly disappear into thin air. I have many such souls in my tree and each and every unwritten story troubles me.  Among my “missing” was Margaret. 
Margaret Ganus was born in 1832 and grew up in the Fayette County area of Georgia.  She was a younger sister to my second great grandfather, John Monroe Ganus, and the third child of James Gurganus and Elizabeth McCluskey in a family of ten children. 
On the 1850 census,eighteen year old Margaret was shown living with her parents and the eight siblings still living at home.  By the 1860 census, however, she was no longer shown living at home.  I realized that in all likelihood, if she had lived until 1860, she was most likely married, but I could not find a marriage record for her.  Margaret’s three sisters, Mary, Martha and Rebecca, all had recorded marriage records which of course helped me to follow them as they established their homes and had their children. But no marriage record could be found for Margaret.  Some speculated that Margaret had died young, but I could find nothing conclusive.
I imagined Margaret to be much like any little girl growing up in mid 19th century Georgia.  I could almost see her running and playing alongside her brothers and sisters in the warm Georgia sun. Growing up on a small family farm, she would have had her share of chores,  helping with everything from the household duties of preparing food and washing clothes to milking cows and feeding the chickens. The day likely began early each morning and the the work would have stretched on until the sun dropped beneath the rolling hills and dense trees that define that region.  At night Margaret likely climbed into a bed shared with several of her sisters.  
Knowing that southern families were tight knit and often lived in close proximity for much of their lives,  I looked for Margaret in Fayette County as well as in neighboring counties, but could find nothing.  For years, her unfinished story was part of my growing pile of genealogical mysteries and just one more frustration. 
I mentioned in a previous post, the value of collaborating with others along the way.  So often other individuals hold critical pieces of information not found in any publicly held document. In this case, posting a query made all the difference. 
On the 17th of October 2002, I received an email from Karen, whom I did not know.  My heart jumped as I opened her email that began with, “I am almost 100% sure that we click.”  I will share what I learned from Karen in my upcoming post.  

Note: Picture The Old Quilt by Walter Langley found on Wikipedia Commons and in Public Domain.
           Continue onto Part 2 of Piecing Together their Lives

          Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2013




Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Just a Little Piece of Paper

"John M. had a brother Jim that went to Alabama."  This simple sentence was scribbled on the corner of a small piece of  faded paper and barely legible. The paper was among a meager collection of a handful of papers and pedigree charts that had belonged to my Grandma and Grandpa Ganus. When I first received the little floral fabric suitcase,  I had had such high hopes that it would be filled with the kind of information that every genealogist dreams of receiving- a family bible, letters rich in genealogical detail and pictures.  At first glance the suitcase appeared to hold just a few pedigrees with names, dates and information which I already had and void of any documentation.  Upon closer examination, however, I found that among the pedigrees sheets were a few choice pieces of papers with handwritten notes that would provide me with some much needed clues.

Grandma had researched in a day without computers and the endless online databases, forums and mailing lists so readily available today.  She was limited by her inability to travel to a distant research facility and the long wait associated with snail mail.  I feel so fortunate to have ready access to so much online data in addition to being close to an excellent research library.  But Grandma had something I don't have---she had people around her that remembered,  people that knew the people who are now just names on a pedigree for me.  How I wish I would have been interested in family history when Grandma was alive and that I had tapped into her knowledge. But I was young and busy and my mind and interests were elsewhere. So I will just be grateful that she took the time to scribble a few notes that I would eventually find and treasure.

My father had no knowledge of Jim, who was John's brother and who had gone to Alabama.  In fact, my family knew very little about John, my own great great grandfather because my grandfather had been orphaned at 8 years of age. So we were left to piece together what we could and  to do our best to learn from what others had recorded, which brings me back to the faded paper and the scribbled note about Jim.  Just who was Jim?

Turning to the 1850 census, I could see that my third great grandparents, James and Betsy Ganus did have a son named James.  Their oldest son, my second great grandfather, John was 22 at the time, but James, a much younger brother was only 11.  In between John and James were brothers David, who was 16 and Jackson (William Jackson) who was 12, along with sisters Margaret and Rebecca, and then some additional younger siblings,  so I find it interesting that James, or "Jim" was the only sibling named on that paper.

Jim's formal name was James W. and he was born Nov 1841, likely in Fayetteville, Georgia. On the 31st of August in 1862, at the age of 21, James enlisted in the Confederate Army and served with the 44th Georgia Regiment. From James' Civil War discharge certificate we learn that he was six feet tall, had a fair complexion, blue eyes and light hair. I love knowing what he looked like.

Battle of Sharpsburg fought September 17, 1862
 near Sharpsburg, Maryland
Picture by Kurz & Allison
I wonder how James' parents felt when they learned that he had been shot in the right arm at The Battle of Sharpsburg, which was known as the bloodiest single-day battle of the Civil War. James was treated and remained with his regiment until he was discharged on July 3, 1863.  I also wonder if James realized how fortunate he was to have survived a gunshot wound during a time when the medicine practiced was relatively primitive and when so many died of infection. His record did indicate that at his release he was partially blind due to sickness contracted while in the service. It went on to state that at that time that James was
 "so blind he cannot see to read or distinguish one person from another at ten paces.  Is unfit for duty in any depart. of government."  
My heart goes out to him, knowing that he was so blind he was considered unfit for duty and yet he would return home and would need to provide for himself and his family for the rest of his life.

Tallapoosa, Haralson County 1890
From Vanishing Georgia used with permission

In about 1865 James married Frances Foster.  They lived in Haralson County and had two children, James C. and Minnie Elizabeth.   Early in my research, descendants of James C. shared with me a story that had been passed down.  According to the story, James' wife Frances had died in childbirth and so James had taken that child, a daughter named Minnie, to her maternal grandmother to raise and then he had taken his son James C. with him and headed to Alabama. While evidence suggests that Frances did die and that Minnie was raised by her grandmother and that James C. remained with his father, James W. actually did not go to Alabama until nearly 30 years later. (I will tell Minnie's story at a later time.)   In about 1875,  James W. married Nancy E. Ayers in Haralson County, Georgia.  No children were ever born to this union.  On January 5th, 1897, Nancy died and was buried in the Fairview West Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery in Cullman, Alabama.  In 1897, James once again married, this time to Martha Henriettta Watterson Basinger, a widow.

February 10, 1899, James applied for relief as a confederate soldier, indicating that he was incapable of making a living by manual labor because of partial blindness and Bright's Disease.  At that time he was 58 and living at Johnson's Crossing in Cullman County, Alabama. The County board indicated that they felt satisfied to the truth of his application and his pension was approved.

On March 18, 1911, James W.  or "Jim" as John called him,  passed from this life. According to his death certificate, he was buried in Fairview West Missionary Baptist Church cemetery although no headstone has been found.

My journey in learning about James all began with the simple words, "John M. had a brother Jim that went to Alabama."  Once again I am grateful for those that took the time to record what they knew, no matter how seemingly insignificant.  It makes me ask myself, what clues am I leaving for the next generation?


Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2012