Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Filling His Time---Part 9 Becoming Acquainted with John M. Ganus

Masons, Buchanan Masonic Lodge #113, Haralson County, Georgia
Although without a doubt, most of John and Olivia's time was spent caring for their farm and their children, I knew they had to be involved in other things. So, I was thrilled to discover that John and Olivia were associated with one of the largest fraternal organizations at that time, an organization, that much like religion focuses on the spiritual side of the human experience.


In the book, "Haralson County, Georgia, A History," by Lois Owens Newman, John Ganus and his brother-in-law, Abner Rainwater, were listed on the membership rolls for the Buchanan Masonic Lodge  #113 in the year 1866, which was the last membership role found for that lodge. In addition, family records indicate that Olivia was an Eastern Star. While both men and women can be an Eastern Star, men must also be a Mason and women must have an affiliation with a Mason. 

Freemasonry has had a long history in Georgia. The first lodge was organized in 1734 in Savannah. As I've read about Masons, I've learned that they have spiritual convictions and are open to people of all faiths. They emphasize among other things, brotherhood, self-improvement and charitable service.

So John and Olivia had found time to participate in a group that focused on service and in making a difference in their community.   

Marietta Camp Meetings, Bethany Baptist Church, Methodist, Baptist, religion in the south
Bethany Baptist Church
Haralson County, GA
Some remodeling has occurred,
but has remained in the same location
(used by permission)
Although no specific religion was recorded for John Monroe Ganus' parents or grandparents, it can be noted that a Methodist Preacher was a witness for John's grandfather, David Gurganus's  Revolutionary War Pension application and that many of the Gurganus/Ganus families participated in the Methodist religion. In addition, in 1850, John was living with his parents, James and Elizabeth among a large group of Methodist families who established the Marietta Camp Ground. The names of the Marrietta tenting families and the history of this campground can be found here:

The History of Marietta Camp Meetings

Religion played an important role in most Georgian's lives. The church provided a place of refuge, a sense of community and provided a kinship that went beyond blood lines.

While it appears that at least some of the early Ganus family had Methodist affiliations, Olivia's family, the Rainwaters, were members of the Baptist church. Although the mention was not always a positive one, Olivia's parent's names can be found in the minutes of the Yellow Creek Baptist Church in Hall County, Georgia. According to Kay Ohana, who was able to view the church minutes on microfilm at the Georgia State Archives in Atlanta, Joshua was received by letter December 15th, 1827, most likely indicating that he had transferred from another church. About six months later, on July 19th, 1828, Polly was received by experience, suggesting that she joined by conversion. A later entry dated the 14th of February 1831, indicated that Joshua "gave satisfaction for drinking too much spirits," and a few days later both Joshua and Polly were granted letters of dismission for drinking. Oh dear!  

You can find Kay's post with the partial minutes of  Yellow Creek Baptist Church here:



Joshua Rainwater and his family later moved to Haralson County and soon listed among the Early Members of Bethany Baptist Church, was Joshua's wife Mary and his children Louisa, John, Abner, Mariah and Olivia. 

With John having at least some association with those of the Methodist faith and Olivia from a Baptist background and their association with the Masons, I initially wondered if religion would play a role in John and Olivia's married life? Time and research told me it would take a significant place in their life, but their chosen religion would come as a surprise to many. 

*Masonic Clip Art was freely shared on http://www.msana.com/clipart.asp

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2017, All rights reserved

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Following in His Father's Footsteps---Part 8 Becoming Acquainted with John M. Ganus


Grandsons learning to plow at
a local living history farm
A few years ago while visiting our daughter and her family on their farm in Central Washington, I rode along with one of the neighboring farmers in his tractor.  I say "in" his tractor because it had an air conditioned cab, power steering and a satellite system that ensured the rows were perfectly straight. I was amazed at how farming has changed from the time I was a teenager and drove a tractor for my cousins as they baled hay. 

Farming has changed even more since my ancestors' day. Georgia farmers often used mules to pull their plows, or pushed them along themselves. For the small poor farmer, their help was often limited to what his family could provide. According to the agricultural digests, it doesn't appear that John ever hired help on his farm, but lucky for him, he had five sons. 

John was a typical Georgia farmer, planting most of his farm in cotton and corn. According to the 1880 Agricultural Census, John was the owner of a 40-acre farm, which included 18 acres of Indian corn, 2 acres of oats, 2 acres of wheat, and 18 acres of cotton. He also had 5 barnyard poultry, 8 swine and one milch cow in addition to one other cow. Cotton was considered one of the most profitable crops in the south and corn was the other commonly grown crop. Corn was needed for the farm animals and was a staple served at the southern table. It would be years before I realized that the corn pone and cornbread often served at my childhood dinner table in California was likely tied to my Southern roots.



cotton, Georgia, Agricultural Census, 1880, Elder Metcalf, farm, genealogy, family history
In 1880, John and Olivia's two oldest sons, William Franklin and John Thackason, were both married, had families and were farming just down the road. The three sons still at home who could help were Roderick Monroe who was 17, Newton Lafayette who was 13 and Robert Lee who was 10. I also know that for a period of time in 1882, John received some help from a Mormon missionary serving in the area. I am so thankful for the insight that the Elder John Metcalf’s journal provides.

According to Elder Metcalf's journal, when he visited John ‘s home on May 19, 1882, he learned that a frost had killed some of John’s cotton and corn. Farmers have always been vulnerable to the unpredictability of the weather, but that didn't softened the disappointment of such a loss. From what I know about John, he was never particularly well off, so I am sure that losing some of his crops came as a blow. The next morning, John got up and did the only thing that he could do and that was to get to work. Elder Metcalf recorded that the next day he helped John to plow, indicating that they plowed half a day and were so busy, he ended up staying the night in the Ganus home. A few days later, John had wheat to bind and Elder Metcalf returned to help. On July 28, Elder Metcalf helped John “plow cotton” and the men once again worked long and late into the evening.

As crops were harvested, a farmer was not yet “done," as the fields had to be cleared and cleaned so that they would be ready in the spring for the new crop to be planted. On September 9th of that same year, Elder Metcalf found John in the field doing exactly that and once again, stepped in to help him.

The following day, September 10, it rained all day and Elder Metcalf recorded that consequently they just “waited it out”. I can almost picture the men, anxious to complete the task, periodically peering out the window for any indication of a break in the storm. The following day, the rain stopped and they were able to return to the field to continue their work. In my mind, I can see the steam rising from the field as the hot Georgia sun warmed the drenched soil. I also can imagine John and Elder Metcalf returning to John’s house at the end of the day, sunburned, tired and muddy from a full day’s work. For three back-breaking days, John and Elder Metcalf worked to clear the field.


September 14, Elder Metcalf helped John pull fodder. After harvesting corn, farmers had to “pull fodder”, which involves pulling the blades off of the cornstalks and gathering them into bunches to dry in the sun. The fodder was then stored to be fed to the cows later. It was difficult work and the sharp edges of the corn blades often sliced their hands in the process.
  


image
Sugar Cane
According to the journal, John raised sugar cane that year and Elder Metcalf was there to help John cut the cane on September 28th, 29th and 30th  and again on October 2nd, and 3rd.  Cutting sugar cane was also difficult work, requiring that each stalk be cut individually from the ground and then at the top, after stripping off the foliage along the sides.3     

As they came to the end of the growing season, John Metcalf returned to John’s farm one final time on October 31 to help John "pull and haul corn."

While Elder Metcalf continued to visit John’s home, no further mention was made that year of helping him on the farm. For the next few months, John would take a brief break from working the soil but would continue to feed and care for his handful of livestock until the following spring, when he would once again begin the process of plowing, planting, and harvesting.



1. Selected U.S. Federal Census Non-Population Schedules, 1850-1880 database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 May 2013, entry for John M. Ganus, District 1143 Haralson, Georgia; Archive Collection Number:  T1137; Page: 08; Line 10

2 Journal of John Edward Metcalf, Mission to the Southern States.  No longer available on the internet. (bulk of material for this post was taken from entries in this journal).

3   Cultivation of Sugar Cane;  William Carter Stubbs; Daniel Gugel Purse, Savannah, Morning News Print, 1900, page 144, found on www.books.google.com

Pictures from Wikipedia Commons, all in Public Domain.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2017, All rights reserved

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

John's Adventure on the Coosa ----Part 7 Becoming Acquainted With John M. Ganus

Sternwheeler, Magnolia, Coosa, Gasden, Rome Georgia,
The Magnolia 

The beautiful sternwheeler, the Magnolia, slowed as it approached the wharf where anxious crowds of people waited for its arrival. There was always excitement in the air when the riverboats arrived and curious towns people always gathered to watch as the passengers descended from the boat, then lingered a little longer while the cargo was unloaded. Wednesday, April 14, 1875 would have been no different as John Ganus arrived on the Magnolia. According to newspaper, John would have paid $1.00 for the round trip from Rome, Georgia to Gadsden, Alabama which is about $22.00 in today's money.

That day the Magnolia's freight consisted of 45 tons of pig iron, 1 lot of cotton seed, 1 bale of cotton and a variety of other merchandise. Typically the Magnolia traveled back and forth from Gadsden to Rome, sometimes making little stops along the way. Had perhaps John taken some things to Gadsden to sell?


The Magnolia was a sternwheeler which is a paddleboat and according to "Haunted Etowah County, Alabama," by Mike Goodson, "The Magnolia was the largest and most elaborate riverboat to make the voyage from Rome to Gadsden."  

On the first of July, 1875, in a newspaper article entitled, "Down the Coosa" the author described a "run to Gadsden and back" and told about the beauty of the trip. The article began with 


"No one who has not taken a trip from Rome to Gadsden upon the swan-like Magnolia, has any conception of the beautiful woodland and farm scenery that meets the eye at every turn of the majestic Coosa."  (http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/ngnewspapers/id:rtc1875-0255)

The author went on to say, 
"As the Magnolia moved around the curves of the tortuous Coosa, presenting at every turn beautiful scenes of waving fields of corn that stretched out from the banks of the river, so darkly green, and the deep foliage of woodland, trees and vines, interlaced by intense luxuriance, it was a refreshing sight . . . In the back ground of these, and for miles distant, can be seen along nearly the whole route majestic mountains and ridges, or spurs of the Lookout chain. "


The author went on to tell that the Magnolia was willing to make landings along the way to assist both the rich who traveled first class and the poor who had very little. 

Although the Magnolia had accommodations for the wealthy class, which included a wonderful dining room, entertainment, and rooms to sleep in, many of the travelers traveled on the lower level and brought their own food. I suspect John would have been found on the lower level. 


The question that remains, however, is just which John Ganus was on the Magnolia that day? Was it a fifty-five-year-old John Monroe Ganus or was it his single twenty-one-year-old son, John Thackason Ganus? 


In either case, I wonder which members of the Ganus family were waiting at the dock for John that day and I wonder if family gathered together that night to hear John's tales of the Magnolia and his adventure on the Coosa.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2017, All rights reserved

Rome Tri-Weekly Courier, April 13, 1875, page 2, http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/ngnewspapers/id:rtc1875-0118