Monday, December 21, 2015

Maybe This Year I Will Win

Christmas traditions, Christmas Gift, family history, genealogy, Ancestors, biscuits and gravy, sliced oranges, traditions
Me beneath our Christmas tree
It happens every year and most years I lose. Maybe this year will be different, but somehow I doubt it.

Each year seems to be about the same. We pull up to my parent's home, quickly jump out of the car and make our way up the walk. My heart is pounding and I am ready. Has my mother been watching out the window? Is she perched at the door, her hand on the knob, ready to jerk it open and beat me at the game? If it is anything like past years, she is waiting, but I always think maybe this year will be different and I will be able to yell it out first.

And then it happens, with one swift motion, my mother yanks open the door while yelling "Christmas Gift." Once again, she's won. That too seems to be tradition.

I had to smile when I did a Google search to see if I could find anything about the origins of this tradition. The point is to yell Christmas gift first and the idea is you then get a gift from the other person. My family has done it as long as I can remember and my mother told me hers did it when she was growing up. But Googling it, I discovered our family isn't alone, in fact I found a discussion about that exact tradition here:  Christmas Eve Gift  and an article about it here:  Dealing With a Peculiar Family Tradition (see article #8).  I learned we certainly aren't the only ones that have that tradition and I discovered that by far the majority had southern roots which made perfect sense since both of my parents have a set of southern grandparents. It makes me wonder about some of our other traditions.

Many traditions morph and evolve over the years as families join and times change, but thankfully many traditions are preserved and passed down, generation after generation.  Sometimes the reason for the tradition may change or is lost, but even still, those traditions can provide continuity and stability to the many generations who share it. So while my mom may seem to win "Christmas Gift" most every year, in reality, continuing and participating in that family tradition makes us all winners.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

What's Under Your Christmas Tree?

It's that time of year and as I wander the toy aisles looking for that perfect gift for grandkids, I find myself feeling overwhelmed, not only by the sheer variety of toys, but also by the noise and flash of today's toys. Dolls call out to me as I pass by, furry stuffed animals bark and meow and toy trucks honk and flash their lights. Times have certainly changed, but I wonder, have kids?

marbles, games, Candyland, Life, childhood, genealogy, family history, ancestors, ancestry
Karl Witkowski-Game of Marbles
Wikimedia Commons 
While I am not sure if kids have changed, I can't help but notice that when the grandkids come over, they choose the old board games from our shelves to play even though we actually do own a few video games. Is it possible that maybe they too see the value in some of the slower, simpler games?

When I was young we played board games such as Checkers and Life, in addition to games such as marbles, jacks, pick-up-sticks and hopscotch. Evenings with cousins often consisted of games of kick-the-can and red rover. The games we played required very little expense and could be played whether or not there was electricity or an internet connection.

The generation previous to mine also played very simple games. Among my most prized possessions are my dad's marbles from his childhood. I can almost imagine Dad and his buddies bent over a circle drawn in the smooth dirt, shooting to win.

genealogy treasures, father, marbles, simple, office
Dad's marble collection
I too played marbles when I was little. I remember having favorite marbles and that often there was a fair amount of marble trading that went on. While boys liked marbles that were good shooters, for me it was all about the color.

We live in a fast paced, noisy world so maybe it makes sense that the toys have become the same. Maybe simpler games were best suited for simpler times, but I can't help but notice that there were certain advantages to playing the games from the "olden days."

I don't ever remember anyone having to go to counseling to deal with a marble or hopscotch addiction. There were no concerns that playing our simple games would result in antisocial tendencies, anxiety or an inability to function in day-to-day life. Families weren't broken up because of anyone's obsession with non-stop rounds of pick-up-sticks and no one feared that we would play endless hours of hide and seek. High tech they were not, but in many ways, I wonder if some of the simple games of yesterday were better. But then again, isn't it typical of the older generation to think that the old ways were best?

While I seriously doubt Santa will get many requests for marbles or pick-up-sticks this year,  I am glad they were part of my childhood and equally glad they were part of my dad's. I keep the treasured jar of my dad's marbles sitting on a shelf in my office. There alongside some of my other genealogy treasures, they warm my heart and serve as a quiet reminder that in many ways, simple is good.


Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Rain, Rain and More Rainwater

Rainwater, newspaper, genealogy, family history, Cloudy Night Rainwater, Wood Rainwater, Night Rainwater, Lloyd Rainwater, Pearl RainwaterNames that are also common words add an extra degree of challenge to genealogical research. Among my ancestors I have names such as Cook, Bell, and Kite. You probably have similarly challenging names in your trees. 

My second great grandmother was a Rainwater, and as you can imagine, researching that name can be challenging. Whether researching in general databases, newspapers or a general Google Search, I frequently find myself wading through results such as rainwater baths, rainwater harvesting, and ads for artesian bath houses with water as-soft-as-rainwater. 

Thanks to classes taken from Lisa Louise Cooke and tips in her book "The Genealogist's Google Toolbox," I've learned tricks to help me narrow down those searches, but with a name like Rainwater, there still seems to be a variety of results sure to bring a smile. 

The two newspaper articles below are just a few examples:


A SERIOUS FALL 
Yesterday morning Mr. Rainwater, engaged at the store of March & Price, while standing on a tall step ladder arranging the price of an immense pile of seersuckers and ginghams they suddenly fell with a dull, sickening thud--we mean the prices.  The proprietors advised Mr. Rainwater to let them B flat.
Fort Worth Daily Gazette (Fort Worth, Texas)  1 May 1887 Sun page 5
accessed on Newspapers.com September 30, 2015


and yet another:

A WELL WATERED BANK 
     There can be water in banks the same as in wells and securities.  
     For instance:  The Rainwater Bank & Trust Co of Morriton, Ark. 
     Wood Rainwater is president of the bank; Cloudy Night Rainwater, vice president and Night Rainwater treasurer. Loid Rainwater and Pearl Rainwater are directors.  But somehow or other Pure Rainwater was left out. Ditto "Rain-in-the-face." 
The Pittsburg Press, October 20, 1913, accessed on Google Newspapers


Yes, Cloudy Night was a man's real name and no, they weren't Native American, but possibly they believed they were.  Cloudy Night Rainwater is in fact in my ancestry and since he is the only child I have listed for that family, I can see that I have some work to do on his family, among other Rainwater families. 

Recent contacts with Rainwater cousins have helped me focus a little more on my Rainwater side of the family and with that has come the realization that I have neglected them for long enough. Maybe it's time I wring out the records in search of my Rainwaters. 

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Site Sleuthing- On Demand Court Records for Oklahoma

Oklahoma, court records, genealogy, family history, research, marriage license

When we lived in Dallas, Texas, shopping was both wonderful and hard. It was wonderful because there were so many options and it seemed that whatever I wanted or needed could be found if I just persisted in looking long enough. The bad part was for someone who is a little compulsive in nature, if I couldn't find something it was hard to just give up because I knew if one place didn't have it, another place might. So with so many options, the search could go on forever and sometimes it felt like it did.

In ways I feel like that is how it is with genealogy research today.  It's good because there is always one more place to look, but bad because the never ending options are responsible for both anxiety and sleep deprivation for many a genealogist.

While some stay within the confines of the sites created specifically with genealogy in mind,  the bottom really opens up once we realize that, in addition to the massive number of records on those sites, there are many options beyond the typical genealogy sites.

A couple of years ago I stumbled onto a website for Oklahoma court records called  "On Demand Court Records." This site has Oklahoma public records searchable for free. In addition, there are subscription options for advanced tools, but so far I have only used the free version which allows me to search by individual, by court, by county, by party type, and date range.

What have I found on the website? The records I've found vary from marriages, imported marriages, divorces, estates,  and lawsuits etc., so in other words, the stuff genealogist love to find!

For example, I found a reference to an imported marriage license for Edgar Howell and Ollie Ganus for 1896. Now granted, I was not successful as long as I searched only for Ollie or Olivia Ganus, but when I searched for Edgar Howell, I was able to find the couple. Unfortunately she is listed as Allie Gomes instead of Ollie Ganus and with that experience, I was reminded to be very creative with spellings and to search for all who may have been involved.

 


One downside is, it is really more of an index, but it is still useful in narrowing down dates and places and in providing clues leading to other existing records.

Some counties have records going further back than others and it's also worth noting that I've found instances where there are records on the site that actually go further back than indicated for that particular county. For instance on the marriage record below,  the marriage license was filed in Lincoln, Oklahoma in 1899 and yet looking at the website's court upload status, it indicates that records for Lincoln County go back to March 22nd, 1904.




Another downside (for your cousins) is that having recent court information online means you get to see references to recent driving violations, arrests or scuffles that friends and family may have been implicated in, which can make for some interesting discoveries and possibly even provide material for some entertaining conversations for the next family reunion.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Two Sisters, Two Stories

As I looked at the pictures of Bertha and Gussie Fricks, I was taken by how much the sisters looked alike, in fact at first I wondered if they were twins. But research would show that they were born two years apart. Bertha was born about 1885 and Gussie was born about 1883. Daughters of Ramsey Fricks and Emma Faucett, the girls grew up in Walker County, Georgia and were sisters to Carl Fricks, whose story I shared here.  

In the picture, the girls wore very similar dresses and both wore their hair pulled up on top of their heads in the Gibson Girl style. Did their dress just reflect the current style for young girls, or did they have the same taste? Perhaps we see the common tendency of a younger sister to imitate the dress and style of an older sister.  

family history, genealogy research, ancestors, research, sisters, Oklahoma
Gussie (Fricks) Brummitt
genealogy, family history, Walker County, Georgia, Bertha Fricks, Gussie Fricks, Faucett, Ramsey Fricks
Bertha (Fricks) Lamb

















I wonder if they were close. Not having any sisters of my own, I used to think about how wonderful life would be if only I had a sister. I imagined that we would play together, share each other's clothes and at night, when we were supposed to be asleep, we would giggle and whisper secrets in the room that we shared. As much as I loved my brothers, I knew that having brothers was not the same deal. I would like to think that Bertha and Gussie had a close loving relationship, although I don't really know. 

In my research, I could see other similarities between the two girls.  They married within two years of each other and both married in Walker County, Georgia. Interestingly enough, both girls married men quite a bit older. Gussie married a man 10 years her senior and Bertha's husband was nearly 7 years older than she was. Each had only one child, a son. (I shared Gussie's story here.)

Whatever similarities existed between the two girls, there were also some striking differences. At the young age of 16, Bertha married Sam Lamb on the 22nd of July 1900. Although several years older, Gussie actually married two years after Bertha. Bertha and Sam's son, Jesse Wallace Fricks, was born about 1902. Gussie and her husband John Brummitt would have a son three years later. 

The most striking difference though was the length of Bertha's life which sadly was considerably shorter than Gussie's. 

Bertha didn't live long enough to appear on a single census with her husband and son.  Dying before her son Jesse was two years old, she missed out on so much. She didn't experience growing old with her husband, nor seeing her son Jesse marry and have children. She never knew the joy that grandchildren bring.

Sadly no death certificate exists for her and not even a Find-A-Grave entry helps identify where she was laid to rest. Thankfully, a short article appeared in the Walker County Messenger, a newspaper for LaFayette, Georgia.  The following entry was published on Thursday February 26, 1903:
"On the 14th inst. while the shades of night hung over our sleeping valley the angel of death entered the home of Mr. Sam Lamb and snatched from his bosom his dear wife. Two short summers ago she stood by his side a beautiful blushing bride full of life and vigor; but soon the much-dreaded monster, consumption, with its cold hands laid hold of her body and finished its deadly work. The deceased was the daughter of Mrs. Ramsey Fricks. In this, the saddest hour of their lives, we offer sympathy and trust that the Good Master will at last lead the bereaved to a sweet home where no sad farewells are heard."   (1)              J.B. Cagle                                                                                                                                                                         
Only 18 years old and with so much ahead of her, Bertha succumbed to the awful disease, consumption, known today as tuberculosis. She left behind her husband of two years and her young son. Two sisters and two stories, but one story was much too short. 


(1)  LaFayette Georgia Walker County Messenger 1902-1905, image 218, February 23, 1903. Accessed on Old Fulton New York Post Cards, October 24th, 2015.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Smile and Say Cheese

I remember the big day of school pictures when I was a kid. Regardless of how my hair looked the day of pictures or whatever goofy expression I might have had when the photographer snapped my picture, my image was forever preserved. That day mattered. 

My kindergarten picture
As a kid I didn't think about it, but as I got older I worried about "picture day." My mom would always order enough pictures for grandparents, other family members and of course all of the little photos which I would carefully cut out and exchange with my friends.

As much as I worried about how I would appear to my friends, it never ever occurred to me that generations later people might look at my picture and try to gather impressions about who I was and what I must have been like. Just as my pictures never told how shy I was or how mischievous I could be at times, I know it is the same for my ancestor's photos. I am thrilled when there are pictures, but I wish those pictures could speak. 

Gussie Fricks Brummitt, Chattanooga Tennessee, genealogy, family history, Sallie Ganus, Sarah Faucett, Carl Fricks Emma Faucett, Ramsey Fricks, Brummitt John Wesley, Brummit Fred J.
Gussie Fricks Brummitt

As I have researched my Faucett and Fricks families, I was happy to realize that my grandma had photos of several of the family members in her little suitcase, including one of Gussie Brummitt (Fricks).

The picture of Gussie reminds me of a school picture but is in fact from the same studio as her brother Carl's picture. I shared his story in a previous post. This picture also bears the stamp which reads "Pickard's Penny Photographs, 820 Market Street, Chattanooga, Tenn, Closed Sundays." In addition a penciled message which is barely visible reads, "Gussie Brummitt sends this to Sallie Ganus." 

Sally (Faucett) Ganus was Gussie's aunt and my great grandmother. 

I love knowing that although Sally had moved to Oklahoma, she had remained in touch with her sister and her family in Georgia. 

Gussie Fricks was a daughter of Ramsey Fricks and Emma Faucett. She was born in Walker County, Georgia on the 19th of November 1883, just a month before Christmas.  Her father farmed a little and also worked as a carpenter.   As the middle child in a large family, she likely helped with cooking, cleaning and tending the younger children when she wasn't in school.

Gussie married John Wesley Brummitt in about 1902, when she was 19 years old. Since the back of the picture gives her name as Gussie Brummitt, it must have been taken sometime after she married John.  

Like her older brothers, she and John soon moved across the border into Tennessee. There they welcomed a son into the world on December 5th, 1905. Fred J. Brummitt would be their only child. 

John Wesley Brummitt registered for the WWI Draft in September of 1918 when he was 45 years old. He was described as being of medium height, medium build, with blue eyes, and gray hair. From that registration card I learned that his left leg was amputated about an inch below the knee. Undoubtedly he faced many challenges as he tried to take care of his many responsibilities as a husband and father.  

John provided for his family in a variety of different ways. On the 1910 census he indicated that he was a constable, on the WWI Registration form he was listed as an inspector of shells at Columbia Iron Works. In 1920 he was a watchman for a machine company. 

Gussie and John did not get the opportunity to grow old together because John died from cirrhosis of the liver in 1922 at the age of 47. Gussie was 39 years old and left alone to care for their 17 year old son, Fred. Two years later Fred married Miranda M. Rowe and for a time Gussie lived with him while working as a packer at a candy manufacturer. 

In 1937 Gussie rented a place across town from Fred and his family. But by 1940 Fred, his wife Miranda and their son John Wesley moved almost 3,500 miles across country to the Seattle area. As a mother and grandmother, I can imagine how alone Gussie must have felt without her husband, her only son or grandson nearby.  

I wonder what Gussie did in her few remaining years. I do know that she died of a stroke in 1943, just a few years after Fred moved. She died in the home of her sister, Mary Victoria (Fricks) Warren. Although her son Fred was there to sign her death certificate as the informant, I wonder, was she able to tell him goodbye?

Her obituary reads as follows: 


DEATHS
BRUMMITT- Mrs. Gussie, 59 died Wednesday morning at the home of her sister, Mrs. E. W. Warren, 5414 Dorsey Avenue. Other survivors are one son, Fred J. Brummitt, Seattle, Wash.; one brother, A.J. Fricks, Chattanooga; one grandson, John Wesley Brummitt, Seattle, Was. (sic) Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the South St. Elmo Baptist Church, with Rev. Frank Ziegler conducting. Burial will be in Chattanooga Memorial Park.  Pallbearers will be Wade Craft, Richard Evans, J. A. Orrell, Will Crane, Richard Kines and Hooper Cordell. The body is at Mrs. Warren's home and will remain there until the hour of service. National Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.         Chattanooga Times, September 23, 1943, p. 15

Way before school pictures entered the scene and way before selfies, thankfully many people had their picture taken. I am so glad that I know what Gussie looked like and that someone sent this picture to my great grandmother Sally Faucett Ganus. If only her picture could help tell her story.   


Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Worth Every Drop of Spit--Carl Fricks Pt 2

Carl Fricks, Mary Alice Ellison, Chattanooga, Tennessee, Family History, Genealogy, FaucettAs I shared on a previous blog post, on the back of a picture in my grandma's collection were the words "Carl Fricks and wife." Initially I had no idea who Carl was, but thanks to a DNA test, I was able to find not only Carl, but a new modern day cousin to help with the search.

With both my new found cousin and I knowing very little, we combined what we did know and then launched into a search to find more about Emma (Martha Ann Emmeline Faucett) and her husband Ramsey Fricks.  My cousin indicated that her records showed that Ramsey and Emma had a son named Carl. Knowing that both Ramsey and Emma's families had lived in Walker County Georgia, we started there.

Sure enough, the 1880 US Federal Census showed Ramsey and Emma Fricks in Walker County, Georgia. At the time they were newlyweds and so only Ramsey and Emma were living in Pond Spring, Walker County, Georgia. [1]

Located in the northwest corner of Georgia, Walker County is nestled up against both the Alabama and Tennessee borders. From there it is about 30 miles to Chattanooga and a little over a 100 miles to Atlanta. With densely treed mountains, rivers, lakes and waterfalls, Walker County was and is beautiful.

It was there that Ramsey and Emma settled down and began their family. Soon the kids began to come and by 1900 Ramsey and Emma had six children living with them, the oldest was 14 and the youngest was 4. [2]  I had hoped to find Carl among those children, but sadly he was not listed in the household. But luckily the census did indicate that Emma had had seven children, so maybe Carl was a part of that family after all. 

While no Carl Fricks could be found on the 1900 census anywhere, according to a 1903 Chattanooga City Directory, a Carl Fricks was living just across the border in Alton Park, Tennessee and working for Chattanooga Bottle & Glass Manufacturing Company.[3] 

A year later, back in Walker County, Georgia, Carl Fricks married his bride Mary Alice Ellison on 2 January 1904.[4] Although they tied the knot in Georgia, by 1910, Carl and Mary were living in Marion, Tennessee, just outside of Chattanooga, along with their two little girls Lela and Geneva (Hassel), and a son, Robert. Carl tried his hand at farming and Emma was busy "keeping house." [5]

Whether Carl tired of farming or simply had other aspirations, he turned to carpentry work in the years that followed and continued in that work throughout his life. Apparently Tennessee agreed with Carl and Alice because they remained there all of their married life. 

On January 28th, 1918, just 20 days after their 14th wedding anniversary, Alice died of heart failure, leaving Carl with their 3 small children.[6]  At the time, Lela was twelve, Robert was eight and Hassel was only six. The following month Carl registered for the draft and from that application we learn that he was of medium height, medium build with brown eyes and brown hair. [7] I can't help but wonder about his emotions as he registered. Was registering such a standard procedure for all men of his age that he registered without thinking much of it, or did he feel a tug at his heart at the thoughts of possibly having to leave his kids? 

The following year, on the 20th of April 1919, Carl, a thirty-nine years old widower, married Edith Coffee (formerly Holtzclaw) [8] and together they created a blended family consisting of Lela, Hassel, Robert E. and her two sons Walter and Willie.  

Once again Carl married in Walker County, but settled down in Tennessee. Always renting, Carl and his family had a tendency to move about somewhat, but always remained in the same general area of Chattanooga. In 1920, thirty-nine year old Carl, forty-two year old Edith along with children Lela, Hassle, Ed and Walter were living in St. Elmo.[9]  By 1930 Carl, Edith and Carl's twenty-four year old daughter, Lela, were living in Chattanooga. [10]

On the 6th of June, 1936 Carl passed from this life due to cardio vascular renal disease. [11] Once again, just as he had done for his marriages, Carl returned to Georgia, this time to be buried.

His obituary reads:
FRICKS, CARL C., 56 passed away at his residence, 5704 Dixie Avenue, Saturday afternoon. Besides his widow he is survived by one son, Edward Fricks of San Diego, Cal; two stepsons, Willie and Walter Coffey of Chattanooga; two daughters Hassel Fricks and Leila Fricks, of Chattanooga; three sisters, Mrs. E. F. Morrell, of Philadelphia, Pa; Mrs Gussie Brummit of Chattanooga; Mrs. E. W. Warren, of Chattanooga;  two brothers, Jack and Merl, of Chattanoga.  Funeral services, conducted by Rev. H. Frank Ziegler, of the South Elmo Baptist church Monday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Interment in Singletery Cemetery, near Cooper Heights, GA. Arrangements by the National Funeral Home. [12]

Carl's death certificate confirms his father was Ramsey Fricks and indicates his date of birth was 18 July 1880. With the 1880 census taken in Walker County just one month prior to his birth, Carl did not appear on the 1880 census with his parents and by the following census in 1900, he was 20 and by all appearances had ventured out on his own. 

My search began with the picture, with the words "Carl Fricks and wife," on the back. Since I first acquired the picture, I've come a long way in learning about Carl's life. As it turned out, this mystery man was in fact my first cousin, twice removed. But there is one question that remains unanswered;  Just who was "and wife?"  

Although I can't say for sure, by her appearance and considering her age, I suspect it was Carl's first wife, Mary Alice Ellison. Carl and Alice married when she was 24, but Carl married his second wife Edith when she was 42. In addition, looking at the styles of hats women wore in 1904, when Carl married Alice as compared to the styles in 1919, when Carl and Edith married, the woman's hat in the picture seems more consistent with the styles of the early 1900's. In either case, I would love a photo of either of these women to help confirm the identity of "and wife."

Going through the DNA matches on Ancestry.com can sometimes be overwhelming. The vast number of matches without the benefit of attached trees is disheartening, the quality of the some of the attached trees and other issues can make the task of finding common ancestors daunting if not down right depressing.That said, sometimes things fall into place and when they do, the effort to do a DNA test is worth every drop of spit and dollar spent to help us find those cousins, both living and dead.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

                                                ________________________

1.  1880 United States Federal Census, Pond Spring, Walker, Georgia; Roll 169; Family History Film: 1254169; Page: 334B, ED 184, Image 0476.  Accessed on Ancestry. com

2.  1880 United States Federal Census, Pond Spring, Walker, Georgia, Roll: 169; Family History Film: 1254169; Page: 334B, ED: 184; Image 0476.  Accessed on Ancestry.com

3.  U.S. City Directories, 1822-1989[database on-line]. Accessed on Ancestry.com

4.  Georgia, Marriage Records From Select Counties, 1828-1978. Accessed on Ancestry.com

5.  1910 United States Federal Census: Civil District 3, Marion, Tennessee; Roll: T624_1512; Page: 11A; ED 0123; FHL microfilm: 1375525. Accessed on Ancestry.com

6.   State of Tennessee, Tennessee Death Records 1914-1955 for Mary Alice Fricks. Accessed on FamilySearch.org

7.  U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Registration State: Tennessee; Registration County; Hamilton; Roll 1852989; Draft Board 2. Accessed on Ancestry.co,

8.  Georgia, Marriage Records From Select Counties, 1828-1978, accessed on Ancestry.com

9.  1920 United States Federal Census,  St Elmo, Hamilton, Tennessee; Roll: T625_1743; Page: 22B; ED 201; Image 778

10.  1930 United States Federal Census; Chattanooga, Hamilton, Tennessee; Roll: 2252; Page: 20B, ED 00061; Image 718.0; FHL microfilm 2341986. Accessed on Ancestry.com

11.  Tennessee Death Records, 1908-1958, Tennessee State Library and Archives; Nashville, Tennessee; Tennessee Death Records, 1908-1959; Roll #5.  Accessed on Ancestry.com

12.  Chattanooga Times, 7 June, 1936 p 7. Obituary obtained from The Chattanooga Public Library. http://chattlibrary.org/

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Web Sleuthing––Chattanooga Public Library

Chattanooga Public Library, Tennessee obituaries, Faucett, Fricks
If you are like me, you are always on the hunt for great genealogy based websites. New websites seem to pop up daily and I love it when others take time to pass on websites that they have found helpful.

I don't profess to be an expert at either finding websites or perfectly navigating them, but periodically I am going to share a website that I like to use.

Recently I found myself researching my ancestry in Tennessee. Of course there are many websites with great information such as Ancestry and FamilySearch, which have many online records, but I also found other helpful resources. One of those sites is the Chattanooga Public Library, which can be found here.

While a lot of their online resources are available only to Tennessee residents or to those  physically in the library, their online obituary index is available to all and provides wonderful clues. I've been thrilled with what I have been able to find there.

The index lists the individual, and sometimes for married women, it also includes their maiden name as well as their husband's name, which of course helped me to know if I had the right person.

Below is an example of a woman listed with both her maiden, married name and her husband's name.



For a fee, the library will copy and mail the obituary to you. I recently sent off for several obituaries and was pleased at how quickly they were mailed back to me. We all know what a treasure trove obituaries can be and I've already found all kinds of goodies in them.

Who have I found so far?   While my direct line of Faucetts migrated to Colorado in the late 1880's, some of my great grandmother's siblings initially remained in Walker County, Georgia and their children and their families moved to Chattanooga. Thanks to the Chattanooga Public Library and their obituaries, I have been able to identify many more relatives in the Faucett and Fricks line. Thank you to the kind staff at the Chattanooga Public Library!

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

DNA to the Rescue

Looking into the camera, there was a faint hint of a smile on her face. Dressed in a fashionable suit, her hair was pulled up under a stylish hat with a large plume. Sitting beside her was a man equally well dressed, sporting a double breasted suit, and a hat cocked slightly on his head. This couple appeared to be a little better off than many of my ancestors. Who were they and what was the occasion?
Carl C. Fricks, Faucett, Genealogy, Family History, DNA, Chattanooga, Tennessee
Carl Fricks and Wife
(original in my possession)

Once again, a simple picture from my Grandma's suitcase would take me on an adventure as I sought to learn more about the identity of the people captured in the photo.

On the back of the picture was written, "Carl Fricks and his wife."  In addition, as a standard part of the photo, it read "Pickard's Photos, 820 Market Street, Chattanooga, Tennessee. CLOSED ON SUNDAYS. This style, 4 for 25 cents."  Simple enough? Well the problem was, I had no idea who Carl Fricks was.

I discovered the picture years ago and after a failed effort to learn who Carl was, I set him aside to work on later. This was long before the onslaught of online databases that are now available and so I turned to the Fricks message boards on Rootsweb and GenForum seeking anyone with connections to a Carl Fricks.  I found a few individuals searching the Fricks family, but no one was exactly sure who Carl was.  Over time and with many other projects to work on, I forgot all about "Carl Fricks and his wife."

Enter DNA!  Recently a DNA test at Ancestry led me to a new cousin and with it a renewed interest in Carl Fricks. I initiated the contact with my DNA match and indicated that I had discovered both the familiar names of Faucett and Fricks in her tree and told her that my great grandmother was Sarah E. Faucett and I was curious about her Fricks family.

She was unsure of how we connected, but shared that she had an Emma Faucett who married a Ramsey Fricks but she was unsure who Emma's parents were. My tree didn't have either Emma or Ramsey.  It would take a little digging to figure out who Emma was.

With what she knew about her Emma, she began the quest to find Emma's parents and it didn't take long. With some research it became apparent that the Martha Ann Emmeline Faucett in my tree and the Emma Faucett in her tree were one and the same. Martha Ann Emmeline Faucett. With that line up of names it is no wonder that without really focusing on her, neither of us had made the connection.

Emma was born the 28th of October 1856 in Chapel Hill, Orange County North Carolina. She was the third child and second daughter of James Merritt Faucett and Elmina Bowers. By 1860 the Faucett family was living in Lafayette, Walker County, Georgia.

Emma married Ramsey Fricks about 1879, likely in Walker County, Georgia,  as both of their families were living there and Ramsey and Emma can be found there on the 1880 census.

So just how did Carl Fricks fit in and why did I have a picture of him? It would take a little more digging to find his story.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved



Tuesday, September 15, 2015

"Old Mag"

I remember loving to watch the cartoon "Heckle and Jeckle."  The two talking magpies were constantly creating trouble and their antics always made me laugh.

If you've forgotten the rascally duo or have never seen the cartoon, I found a compilation of some of their cartoon antics here.

I am not sure if there weren't any magpies where I grew up or if I was just oblivious to them, but I never remember having them around. But I do remember after a move to a new state that I was surprised to learn that the annoying birds who made a daily ritual of stealing our dog's food and then taunting him with it were the very birds who had made me laugh as a child.

Apparently magpies can be found in Colorado because in her autobiography, Olive E. Faucett Christensen shared an experience she and her cousins, Orson and Heber Ganus, had with a magpie. At the time the orphaned twins were living with their cousins.




According to Olive, the twins Orson and Heber robbed magpie nests and broke the eggs. I am not sure why they thought that was fun, but I've long since given up trying to figure out little boys. Apparently one day when the two boys were out looking for eggs to break, they found a baby magpie and decided to bring it back to the house. Orson, Heber and Olive put the little bird in a box and kept him in the house as a pet. The three kids would spend time gathering worms and feeding the little bird. As it grew, Olive said it began to make weird noises, but it was gentle and stayed in the house and the kids decided it was a great pet to have around. They called the bird "Old Mag."

Olive's mother must have been a very patient woman to have allowed a magpie to live in their home. Knowing what I do about magpies, I can imagine not only the mess the bird must have made, but the mischief it must have caused as they seem prone to take things and to torment. But apparently those weren't the only issues to be concerned about. Olive recorded that with time their little pet became a lot less gentle. In Olive's words:
"As it grew older, it sorta got mean, its tail never did grow out and when it started to talk it would ruffle up its feathers and if it could get to your bare hand it would sneak up when you weren't looking, sock its bill down in your flesh as hard as it could, then step back and laugh and just shake all over like it was tickled to death. It loved a bare foot or elbow."
I would think that might be a good time to send the bird on its way, but apparently even its meanness didn't persuade the kids to get rid of her. It would appear that Old Mag was just as attached to the kids as Olive indicated that the grouchy pet was in and out of doors, free to do as she chose and she chose to stay.

Olive shared that one day Old Mag messed with the wrong guy when she bit Orson really hard and he hit her with a stick. She said that they kept her for a long time after that, but one day she disappeared and they never knew what became of her. Maybe Old Mag had had enough or just maybe.....someone else had.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

The Day the Hair Ran Out

I remember all too well an experience I had my freshmen year of college when a group of boys from the nearby dorms asked me and my roommate if we could cut hair. We told them sure we could and to come on over. Why either of us said such a thing, I am not sure because neither of us had the faintest idea how to cut men's hair. At the time I do remember thinking it couldn't be that hard.

genealogy, family history, story, family, Sanford Colorado, Orson Ganus
My roommate had at least watched her brothers get their hair cut a few times, so it was decided that she would be the authority and we would sit the guys in chairs side by side and I would watch what she was doing and mimic it.

The appointed time arrived and not one or two, but a handful of young men from the boys' dorm showed up. We set two chairs side by side and a guy plopped down in each chair.

I cringe, knowing that neither of us had hair cutting scissors. It only got worse because she got a guy with regular hair and I got a guy with extremely thick curly hair. The same method did not work on both heads of hair.

I don't remember the specifics of what happened when I was done or what was said, but maybe that's a blessing. What I do remember is that  I avoided that guy for a very long time afterwards. I can only imagine the conversation that went on in the boys' dorm that night. Not surprisingly, no one ever asked us to cut their hair again.

Apparently I am not the only one who was naive enough as a young girl to think that just anyone could cut hair. One of the funniest stories I came across in Olive E. Faucett Christensen's autobiography is a similar story involving my grandfather's twin, Orson Ganus. Olive shared the following experience:
"Now I want to tell one on Orson and I.  He had a heavy head of hair almost black and wavy. He was really getting shaggy.  I had watched people cut hair so I suggested I cut his hair. He said okay. We never said anything to Mamma, but got out by the house, kinda out of sight. I got my sissors and went to work on him. I cut for quite a while but it didn't seem to be shaping up like I thought it would so I'd size him up, cut some more here, then it needed something on the other side or in the back. I still whacked a little, by now I was getting a little worried. I began to wonder what I was going to do when the hair ran out. I was still clipping a little but feeling smaller and smaller until I didn't feel larger than a midget. I began to wonder what the haymen would say and what Papa would say. I quit cutting his hair and began to talk good to Orson and asking him to stay away from the dinner table and I'd bring his dinner to him. So he hid out at noon but we had to tell Mamma, she couldn't help but laugh because he looked a fright. That was one time I was glad hair could grow out."
Orson Merritt Ganus, Family History, Genealogy, family story, Sanford Colorado
Orson Ganus with unknown child,
Orson maintained a thick head of hair most of his life
Generously shared by great grand-daughter, Amy Moss

We've all had our bad hair days, but I can only imagine how Orson felt the following day when he faced the other men and boys in the hay fields. Although hair thankfully does grow back, Orson likely remembered that hair cut for a long time and the day the hair ran out.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Boxing and Crying

Those who have been following my blog are probably well aware that my grandpa, Heber Monroe Ganus, was orphaned at a young age.  Being a pivotal point not only for my grandpa but for his descendants as well, it is a point of reference for so many of my stories here.  If you haven't been following, you may want to read a little about the brothers and what happened here and here.

Because grandpa was orphaned and lived in several homes, we know little about his early life, so finding a few recollections of his childhood, no matter how brief, is a blessing. I found some stories about my grandpa and his brother Orson in a most unexpected place.

family history, genealogy, Sanford Colorado, Alamosa Colorado, Faucett, Ganus, orphan
Ernest and Heber 
On a recent visit to Brigham Young University (Go Cougars!) I visited their library and decided to take a look at an autobiography of Olive Elmina Faucett Christensen who lived in Alamosa, Colorado. I didn't know anything about Olive because I haven't worked much on my Faucett line, but knowing that my great grandmother was a Faucett and that she had lived in the Alamosa area for a time and knowing that her mother's name was Elmina, I was sure there was a link between her and Olive. I hoped that maybe there would be some mention of their ancestry, but was delighted to find instead a few stories that no governmental record can provide. This find underscores the value of learning all that you can about extended family. You never know what other treasures you might find in the process.

When Grandpa Heber's parents died, he and twin Orson and their older brother Ernest remained in Oklahoma for a time with their father's family but a year later went to Colorado to live with their mother's family. Orson went to their mother's brother, Thomas, Heber went to her brother Alfonzo, and Ernest went to Sally's oldest sister, Mary Haggard.  Both Thomas, Alonzo and Mary lived in Sanford so, although the brothers were split up, they lived relatively close to each other. Olive was Thomas' daughter and Orson became like a brother to her.

Olive's autobiography [1]  is a wonderful rambling of memories from her childhood as she recalls everything from how they made their beds, to milking cows and raising chickens as well as local events such as dances and ball games. While her book is difficult to find, if you would like a peek into life in rural Conejos County Colorado in the early part of the 20th century, locating a copy to read is worth the effort. I will be sharing several of her recollections of Orson and Heber over the next few blog posts.


In one account, Olive provided a brief look into what became a regular evening activity for Orson and Heber. Olive shared:
"One time Papa got Orson some boxing gloves for Christmas, things really got going then. Heber would come down from Uncle Fon's and everybody would get them to boxing.  Heber was a little tougher than Orson, but they would really box. Orson would hit and cry and hit and cry.  Then as the kids grew up they got a larger set of boxing gloves and boxing went right on down the line.  After supper men and boys would get out in the yard and box."

Other than the crying part, the story warms my heart.  It's good to know the boys got together in the evenings and "played," which in this case meant boxing each other's ears. Hopefully between the tears, there was also laughter and bonding. Because it became a repeated event and they later got larger gloves in order to continue the activity, I tend to think it was something they enjoyed doing together.


Orson Ganus, Heber Ganus, twins, orphans, Southern Colorado, boxing
The twins
Orson and Heber Ganus 

[1] Autobiography of Olive E. Faucett Christensen, written January through December 1957, Artcraft Printers, Alamosa, Colorado


Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Monday, August 24, 2015

Life Altered in an Instant

How often have you wished you could do something over again, vowing that this time you would do it better?  Sometimes the consequences of snap decisions are just annoying, but other times they are tragic.

As I shared in last weeks post, (found here) running across a McCleskey among Utah Death certificates came as a surprise, especially since it was a McCleskey with a connection to my family in Oklahoma. It would take some digging to find the story, but things eventually fell into place.

muskogge oklahoma, okmulgee oklahoma, genealogy,  family history

Lillian Howell was born in 1883 in Collin County, Texas to Henry Harrison Howell and Amelia Louisa Turner.  Lillian grew up in a household of 11 children, two were half siblings from her father's prior marriage. By 1900 the family moved to Creek Nation, Indian Territory.

Two years later, on 28 December 1902, nineteen year old Lillian Howell married thirty-one year old Benjamin Green McCleskey in Muskogee County, Oklahoma.

A year later their first child Floyd Elmer was born in 1903, followed by Williard Roscoe in 1904. Raymond was born in 1906 and Green Russell McCleskey was born on the 31 of March in 1909, likely in Okmulgee where his family was living in 1910. The brothers were close in age with all four born within six years. I can only imagine the challenges their mother faced as she raised four boys so close in age. 

Russell and his brothers all learned to read and write and helped their father on the farm. Life was hard and there was a lot to do for those families struggling to farm in the early days in Oklahoma. 

I wonder how many times over the years Russell's father, Benjamin, shared the story of losing his father, George Walter McCleskey, in a shootout with Native Americans in Weatherford, Texas, a story I shared here.

At the age of 20, Russell proposed to Virginia Canes and they tied the knot on March 2, 1929 in Okfuskee, Oklahoma.  While most couples feel a certain sense of optimism and hope for the future, few anticipate the challenges and difficulties that come with life. Sadly Russell and Virginia's life would include a very tragic event within their first year of marriage. 

When Russell and Virginia married, Oklahoma was already struggling economically, but the big stock market crash would occur later that year making life even more difficult. Jobs were hard to come by and people were willing to look beyond their immediate communities. I am not sure how Russell learned of the job, but he was hired to work for a loan company in Utah, so he and Virginia packed up and made the nearly 1,300 mile move to Utah.

In Salt Lake City, Russell worked as a manager for The Commercial Discount Company while Virginia worked as a telephone operator. They lived in a small three-year old brick house located at 1453 Westminster Avenue in Salt Lake City, Utah. They were some of the lucky ones. 



rumble seat, accident, salt lake city utah, genealogy, family history


Over Labor Day weekend in 1930, Russell and Virginia went on a little trip to Ogden with friends, Alma U. Daniels and wife Bernice. Bernice also worked for the phone company and it is likely the wives met there. In addition, the couples were close in age and lived within five minutes of each other. 


fall colors, Utah, Ogden, family history, genealogy
9/28/2012 Ogden, Utah 
The 2012 Federal Duck Stamp Contest 
photo by Garry Tucker, USFWS
On Monday evening, September 1, 1930, the couples returned from Ogden, driving along the Ogden-Salt Lake highway, a distance of about 40 miles. Riding along the base of the Wasatch Mountain range, they would have had a clear view of mountains, ablaze with the colors of fall. 

With an altitude of a little over 4,000 feet, evenings in Salt Lake City tend to cool down considerably as the sun drops and such was the case that day. Although the high on September 1, 1930 was 81, the low was 55. [1] While Alma, Bernice and Virginia rode in the front seat of the car, Russell rode in the rumble seat in the back, which soon became too cool. Several articles reported simply that G. Russell tried to move from the rumble seat to inside the car while it was still moving. Thankfully the following article gave a more complete picture of the events that occurred.[2]




Green Russell McCleskey, Alma U. Daniels, Salt Lake City, Utah. Benjamin Green McCleskey, William McCleskey, Raymond McCleskey, Floyd McCleskey, Oklmulgee, Genealogy,  Family History,

The newspaper reported that Russell died of a skull fracture, but the death certificate indicated that he probably died from a broken neck. [3]



Green Russell McCleskey, Virginia McCleskey, Salt Lake City, Utah, Okmulgee, Oklahoma, genealogy, family history, research, death certificate

I can't comprehend the shock folks must have felt as the news reached Russell's friends and family in Oklahoma. Russell was a young man in the prime of life with so much ahead of him. He was working, renting a nice home and was newly married. As friends and family gathered to comfort his devastated parents, Benjamin Green McCleskey and Lillian Howell, I imagine his aunt and uncle, Henry Edgar Howell and Ollie (Ganus), were among them. There would be many hard days to follow.

Life can be altered forever in an instant. A seemingly simple action can lead to a tragic end. How often I have replayed an incident over and over in my mind, wishing I could go back and do it again but different. If only.....

Married just over a year, Virginia had her husband's body shipped back to Oklmulgee and buried in the Okmulgee Cemetery. 


[1] "The Weather" column Salt Lake Telegram, September 1, 1930, image 7, Utah Digital Newspapers;  http://digitalnewspapers.org/, accessed 14 August, 2015. 

[2] Salt Lake Man Killed In Fall off Auto, Salt Lake Telegram, September 2, 1930; Utah Digital Newspapers, http://digitalnewspapers.org/; accessed 11 August, 2015. 

[3]  Utah Death Certificate Index, Utah Department of Administrative Services,http://www.archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/20842.htm, Green Russell McCleskey Death Certificate, accessed 14 August 2015. 


Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Monday, August 17, 2015

Lost and Found

Sometimes you find people where you least expect to find them! 


Martha Olivia Ganus wife of  Henry Edgar Howell, daughter of William Franklin Ganus
Martha Olivia (Ganus) Howell
(Original photo in my possession) 
While helping a friend do some research, I spent some time searching the Utah Death Certificates. While I was at it, I couldn't resist putting in a few of my own family names into the search box just for fun. I really didn't expect to find anyone because the majority of my ancestors lived in the southern states. 

Imagine my surprise when I typed in McCleskey and up popped Green Russell McCleskey. Although not a direct ancestor, Green Russell McCleskey's family lived near my family in both Georgia and Oklahoma and with the name of McCleskey (my brick wall) I've kept my eye on this family for some time. 

Russell's mother, Lillian Howell, was a sister to Henry Edgar Howell, who married Martha Olivia Ganus, my grandpa's half sister. Martha Olivia, or "Ollie" was William Franklin Ganus's daughter with his first wife, Mary Matilda Roberts.

Just to make sure that this was the same Green Russell McCleskey, I double checked my database and confirmed that, yes, parents and his birth date were the same.  

Since my grandfather's half sister, Ollie (Ganus) Howell was Green Russell McCleskey's aunt and they lived in the same area of Oklahoma, I felt sure that the families interacted. Below are the Howell, McCleskey and Ganus families and the red helps to clarify the link. 

Henry Harrison Howell b. 1840 IL d. 1928 Ok
married Amelia Louisa Turner b. 1852 IL d. 1928 OK

Children of Henry and Louisa


   1. Katherine Anne Howell b. 1873
   2. Henry Edgar Howell b. 1875 Il d. 1951 Ok marr. Martha Olivia Ganus b. 1880 GA d. 1916 OK
   3. Elroy Howell b. 1878
   4. Lily Howell b. 1883 TX d. 1899 OK
   5. Lillian Howell b. 1883 TX d. 1974 Ok married Benjamin Green McCleskey b. 1871 Tx d. 1932 OK

       Children of Benjamin and Lillian
    
            * Floyd Elmer McCleskey b. 1903
            * Raymond C. McCleskey b. 1906
            * Green Russell McCleskey b. 1909
            * Willard McCleskey b. 1913

   6. Lela Howell b. 1886 Tx d 1905 Ok
   7. Pearl Howell b. 1889 Tx d. 1905 Ok
   8. Willis Jay Howell b. 1895 OK
   9. Minnie Mae Howell b. 1895 OK          
         

So what was Green Russell McCleskey, an Oklahoma boy, doing in Salt Lake City, Utah and what was his story?  Have your kleenex ready for next week's post when I share the story I uncovered. 


Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Pass It On

As genealogists we would all like to think that what we do will matter to future generations. We hope that our efforts will mean something and that after we are gone, someone will pick up where we left off. What can we do to help instill an interest in the younger generation? 

Recently I've had grandkids express an interest in "doing what you do, Nana." Frankly it surprised me because they are still relatively young. But when we recently held a family reunion with our kids and grandkids, we decided to weave in a few family history experiences along with the other activities. 

genealogy, family history, FamilySearch Discovery Center, family reunion
Using the iPads to learn about their ancestors 


One thing we did was to take the grandkids down to Family History Discovery Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. They have varied activities to help families learn about their family history and many, if not most of the activities are very child-friendly. 

FamilySearch Discovery Center, teaching children genealogy, reunion
Seeing their ancestors' immigration 


Upon entering the center, we received an iPad to use during our visit. After logging into a FamilySearch account,* we placed the iPad on various displays and had a totally customized experience as we learned about our ancestors. 

Drawing on what is in the FamilySearch tree, we had a choice of a variety of activities. One activity allowed us to see our ancestors' immigration and life events displayed on a large map. In one of the rooms in the center, a display transformed the room to the ancestor's time period while we learned what life was like for them.



genealogy, family history, FamilySearch Discovery Center
Grandchild's face in a costume of his ancestry 



Another display showed the ethnic origins of our ancestors. The kids loved being able to have their picture taken in their ancestor's costume. 

Another booth allowed us to record some of our own life experiences. The kids thought it was a lot of fun to answer the questions. 

The next two days of our reunion were filled with fun activities such as riding go-karts, swimming, bowling, boating at the lake and roasting hot dogs over the fire in the mountains. We had a great time together. 

On the last day of our reunion, following a dinner of barbecue chicken, corn on the cob, pasta salad and watermelon, one of our daughters pulled the kids aside for an activity that helped the kids learn about a couple of their ancestors.

With a little help, the kids had fun painting the backdrop for the play they would put on. We had to giggle when we saw the 2 year old busily painting his legs instead. Thankfully it was a very washable paint.



genealogy, family history, FamilySearch Discovery Center, family reunion
Painting the backdrop for the play
Ancestry, Genealogy, reunion activities














After they finished painting the backdrop, our daughter gathered the children around her and told them two stories about their ancestors. One story was from their grandpa's side and one was from my side of the family.

Then the adults pulled up their lawn chairs and enjoyed the production. While our daughter and her husband narrated the stories, the kids acted out the scenes from their ancestors' lives, adding a little of their own creative interpretation. While I doubt my ancestor actually did the "happy dance," when the thief who stole his last morsel of bread for his family died or that my husband's ancestor turned into the headless horseman following his trek across the plains as portrayed by another grandchild, we surely enjoyed their dramatized versions and overall, I think our ancestors would have approved.
family reunion activity, genealogy play, ancestors, ancestry, pioneers
I don't remember a headless horseman as part of the story!


Following the play,  we enjoyed a dutch oven dessert and a firework show. The reunion was a success and a wonderful time to reflect on the past, enjoy the present and look forward to more time together in the
future.


After everyone went home and the clutter was picked up, the sticky floors were mopped and the mountains of laundry were done, I reflected on our reunion and felt that deep contentment that comes from having spent time with those you love . We had a great time and I wondered if just maybe in the process of having fun, we were also able to instill in our grandkids a desire to learn a little more about their heritage.



The cast 

One of my favorite comments came from a nine year old grandson. Because he was one who has expressed an interest in doing genealogy,  I asked him after visiting the Discovery Center what he would like to help with. He looked at me and said, "Did you notice that some of the people in our tree didn't have a death date? We don't even know when and where they died. That bothered me. I want to help find that information."

I am amazed how quickly he picked up on the missing information and thrilled to learn that someone from the younger generations is already ready and willing for me to pass it on. 






*To participate using an ipad at the Discover Center,  you must have a FamilySearch account. To sign up for an account,  you must be 8 years and up. Set up the account prior to visiting the center. Younger children will be outfitted with a backpack and hat to help them feel part of the adventure. 


Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved