Sunday, August 17, 2014

Happy Blogiversary to ME!

Today is my blogiversary marking two years of blogging.  Although still a "baby blogger" by most standards,  I am amazed at all that I have already gained from blogging.  My initial intention was to share my stories for the benefit of others who are researching my families or locations, but in reality I am the one who has benefitted.  I would like to share a few of the ways blogging has helped ME! (Just what's on your "benefits of blogging" list?)



Benefits of Blogging


1.  I realize that although I know a lot about my ancestors, there really is so much more to learn.

As I began to write their stories,  I was initially amazed at how often I needed to stop and do more research.  The process of writing has helped me to see the holes in my research, which in turn has led me to new discoveries.  Suddenly it made total sense that we are encouraged to stop and write when we hit a brick wall.

2.  I realize how often I assume information.

In the process of writing my ancestors' stories, I can see that it is so easy to assume things that are not actually substantiated by fact.  Sometimes those assumptions are just floating around in my head, influencing the decisions I make on where to look next when, in reality, I need to be looking elsewhere. It's a good reminder to not be too quick to jump to conclusions and to always check the facts before assuming anything.

3.  I benefit from the experience of other bloggers.

I think we all have little tunnels of reasoning that our thoughts tend to follow.  I know I sure do and I have benefitted a great deal from the comments and insights that other bloggers have shared as comments on my blog.

4.  Blogging is helping me to learn more about the topics of interest and my areas of research.

We love to visit and chat with people who like the things we like.  As anyone who has attended a genealogy conference can tell you, this certainly extends to genealogist.  Blogging about a topic or location has served as a magnet for other like-minded genealogists.  They in turn have shared new websites and sources, which of course have benefitted me immensely.

5.  Blogging is broadening my circle of friends and associates.

I love the opportunity to interact with the community of genealogy bloggers. (Thank you Thomas MacEntee for establishing Geneabloggers.) Not only am I learning more about how to be a good blogger, but I have also connected with new friends.  The world truly has become a little smaller in the process.

6.  The "cousin bait" thing really works.

We've all  heard that blogs can serve as "cousin bait."  I am still waiting for a major breakthrough from a newfound cousin, and while I haven't received a boatload of genealogical goodies from anyone yet (although I still have hope), I have received a few stories and pictures that I have absolutely loved.

7. Having a blog is forcing me to sit down and write.

For years, I said I was going to write....tomorrow......next week or maybe after the upcoming major event.  The truth of the matter is I like the thrill of the chase, which is research.  But having a blog and wanting to have something to share in my blog has forced me to quit procrastinating and make writing a priority.

8.  Writing a blog has reminded me that before I conquer writing that family history book someday, I need to remember how to write.

I am amazed at how many of the writing rules and "niceties" I have forgotten and how much I need to practice practice practice.

9.  Because I blog, I read other people's blogs more often.

Writing a blog has created a greater interest in poking around the web to see what other people write about in their blogs.  From other people's blogs I've learned about everything from how to blog to how to research and everything genealogical in-between.



10.  Blogging is just darn fun!

I don't know what I expected exactly when I started blogging, but I didn't realize that writing a blog would be so much fun, but it is!  Writing, sharing, reading other's stories and seeing the stories in my own ancestors' lives unfold as I write have all added a new dimension to my world of genealogy.


While "blogiversary" is a bit of a funny word, it is definitely something worth celebrating.



Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2014,  All rights reserved

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

I've Got News!

I've got news!


I am excited to share that I have recently been asked to be part of the "May I Introduce to You" team at GeneaBloggers

Each Monday GeneaBloggers publishes an interview with a blogger from the genealogy community.  For five years Gini Webb has done an excellent job conducting the interviews and sharing the stories in "May I Introduce to You."   Recently she and Thomas MacEntee decided to expand the team and invite four additional individuals to be part of their team.  I am pleased and excited for this opportunity and look forward to this new adventure.  

Please take a minute to click on the link below and visit the website where you can read the announcement and meet each member of the team. 



Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2014,  All rights reserved




  

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

It Was Over--Or Was It?

It was 1871 and, although the Civil War had been over for many years, for many Southerners it was far from over.  Many struggled with substantial losses on a variety of levels.  Land stripped and void of vegetation, loss of farm animals and in many cases the complete loss of their homes and personal belongings all contributed to a sense of desperation.  It would take many years to establish a sense of normalcy in their lives and some would never fully recover.  Living just outside of Atlanta, Georgia, the Ganus families were among the many that struggled.

North Side of Atlanta
following the war
Library of Congress
Beginning in March of 1871, the federal government allowed citizens in some Southern states to file for compensation for the losses sustained during the Civil War.  Applicants were required to prove that property was taken or destroyed by the Union Army.  In addition, applicants were required to prove that they remained loyal to the federal government during the war. Thousands of Southern citizens sought relief from their impoverished condition by applying.  Burton W. Cook and wife Mary (Ganus) were among those who applied.

In Clayton County, Georgia on the 26th of June, 1871,  Burton filled out an application for losses he suffered at the hand of the Union Army.   His claim was rejected without justification.

The paperwork however still contributes information to what is known about Burton.  Filed among the Southern Claims Commission papers, Barred and Disallowed,  Burton claimed the loss of a mare valued at $100.00 and 35 bushels of corn valued at $35.00.   He indicated the property was taken in Fayette County, Georgia by General Sherman's army on its way to Jonesboro on 31st of August, 1864.  

Anxious for any opportunity to receive their "just dues" from the federal government, many Southerners filed erroneous claims.  The question is not whether Burton's family suffered losses, but whether Burton was always loyal to the US Government?  I suspect I know the answer.   While Burton's damages pale in comparison to many other claims, unfortunately, his claim also lacks the testimony that accompanies many claims.  As luck would have it, his file consists of four pages of the basic form, with no additional testimony.

The files can provide interesting reading.  Some include testimony in which the claimant describes in great detail the harsh circumstances personally endured.  Some include dramatic statements of their professed allegiance to the government.  Often such richly woven stories include the names of family, neighbors and friends.  I found myself smiling at one such lengthy claim that comprised many pages of testimony describing the claimant's love for the federal government in addition to his secret disdain for the rebel cause.  The claimant added that he had always supported the federal government.   Unfortunately his case was rejected with the conclusion that not only had the man supported numerous sons while they served as Confederate soldiers, but he himself had served for a time and had contributed substantial funds and supplies to the Confederate Army.

Burton too had served in the Confederate Army from the beginning of the war until the end when he was released as a prisoner of war, and yet he filed a claim.  Was his application simply an effort to receive compensation for losses?

The basic form that Burton filled out required that the applicant provide the names of individuals who could verify the truth of the claim.  I was interested to know who he listed and was pleased to see his witnesses were James Ganus of East Point, Fulton County, Georgia and Mary Cook, also of East Point.  Mary was Burton's wife and James was his father-in-law.  While the document does not contain James' actual signature, it does give me reason to believe that James lived at least until June of 1871 when the application was filled out. James was shown living with Burton and daughter Mary on the 1870 US Federal Census.  This is the latest document currently known on which James' name appears. James would have been approximately 72 years old, a ripe old age for that time.


While Burton's file is relatively small, I am grateful for the few details it provides.  Once again I am reminded of the benefits of finding all documents relating to our ancestors.

I am sure Burton felt at least some disappointment when his claim was rejected, although his situation was not uncommon.  The number of people claiming property loss greatly exceeded the number who received compensation.   Undoubtedly, for those who had been so vested in the Southern cause, proving their loyalty to the US Government was a difficult sell.

The war was over,  issues continued and yet slowly the South did rebuild.  While much had been destroyed, the unconquerable spirit for which Southerners were known survived.  And so, Burton and his family, along with countless others, began the tedious process of rebuilding.

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2014,  All rights reserved