Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Sleeping Over ---12 - Becoming Acquainted with John M. Ganus

Every summer our family loaded up the station wagon and made the drive from California to Colorado where all of our relatives lived. We loved the time with our extended family and couldn't wait to get there. 


My brothers and a cousin in Colorado

When we stayed at my Grandma Hostetter's house, I usually slept on the hide-a-bed sofa in the living room. I didn't mind that bed so much, but the location provided some challenges. In her small little house, the living room was adjacent to the dining room where a large cuckoo clock from Switzerland hung on the wall. It was great to watch the little Swiss people come out and dance to the music during the daytime hours, but much to my dismay, those same little people never slept and the clock played off and on throughout the night. In addition, Grandma was a very early riser and she would get up in the wee hours of the morning to go work in her garden. Accustomed to living alone, she probably didn't realize how loud the screen door slammed on her way out. 



Sleeping at other people's homes can sometimes be challenging.

In the nineteenth century, the LDS missionaries went out without purse or script, meaning they relied on others for a meal and a place to stay. The missionaries in Polk County, Georgia were welcome in the Ganus' house and they frequently stayed in their home. In his missionary journal, Elder John Joseph Pledger Murphy recorded some of the experiences he had staying with the Ganus family. 


Elder Murphy once told John M. Ganus that he hadn't stopped at the mill one evening where the Ganuses were working because he "got tired of lying on the soft side of a board during the war." The following night he stayed at John's home and it may have made sleeping on the soft side of a board look good. 

Elder John Joseph Pledger Murphy
As was common among the poorer class of people during that time, when staying at the Ganus's home, Elder Murphy didn't get a guest room or even his own bed, but shared the bed with John's son, Newton. Elder Murphy recorded on Sept 10, 1886:
"Stayed all knight at Bro. Ganus. Slept with Newt, he kicked and punched me all knight."
The next night wasn't much better, Elder Murphy recorded:
"Saturday , Sept 11, 1886 I spent the day at Bro. Ganus wrote a letter to Bro. D. H. Peery of Ogden concerning Brother W. F. Ganus getting a job with him in the mill also I showed Bro. Ganus about getting up his genealogy at night I went down and slept with his little boy and he tried to be on me all knight with his feet. I was almost sick with cold and nervous."
On Saturday, October 23, 1886, Elder Murphy went with Frank (William Franklin Ganus) to John's son's home, John Thackson Ganus. When Elder Murphy referred to John Monroe Ganus, he called him Brother John Ganus, but when he referred to John's son, John Thackason Ganus, he called him simply John Ganus as John T. had not yet been baptized. 

Although Elder Murphy's experience was slightly different at John Thackason Ganus' home, he still didn't get an uninterrupted night of sleep. Elder Murphy recorded:
"Frank and me slept at John Ganus the bed fell down with us. "
Despite the difficulty in getting a solid night's sleep at the Ganuses, Elder Murphy returned to the Ganus household time and again. I guess although sleeping at the Ganus' house sometimes had its challenges, it still beat sleeping on the soft side of a board. 

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2017, All rights reserved

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

He Dared Let Them Stay ---11 Becoming Acquainted with John M. Ganus

John and Olivia had been baptized just a little over a year when on April 12th, 1881, Elder John E. Metcalf boarded a train in Salt Lake City, bound for Georgia. He had been called to serve as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints and would serve in the Southern States. Sharing his beliefs with the people of the South would mean spending several years away from his family who were living in Sanpete County, Utah. 

The Mormon missionaries of that time traveled without purse or script, relying on the goodness of those whom they met to allow them to stay and offer them a meal. But with mounting violence aimed at members of the LDS faith and the Mormon missionaries, some were afraid to allow the missionaries to stay in their home. John and Olivia, however, opened their door to the missionaries, including Elder Metcalf, who soon became a frequent visitor in their home.  


John E. Metcalf, missionary, Mormons, genealogy, family history, faith, persecution
John E. Metcalf, Jr.  
There were very few members of the Mormon faith where John and Olivia lived, and there wasn't a church building for them to meet in. Mormon meetings often drew the attention of those who opposed them and so members were cautious about when and where they met and at times they were counseled not to gather at all. In neighboring communities, Mormons and Mormon missionaries were shot at and some were killed, their homes and barns burned to the ground. 

A story in the Deseret Evening News, on 22 July 1879, told about an incident that took place in Varnell, Whitfield County, Georgia:
"In May, Elder C H. Hulse and Thomas Lloyd, of Cache Valley, passed through Varnell's on the way to North Carolina, when the same mob came upon them, entered the house of one of the Saints, flourishing pistols, swearing to kill the inmates if they ever harbored the Elders again and drove the brethren out of the neighborhood." (1)
These incidents grew in number and intensity in the years that followed. Nevertheless, at great risk to themselves, John and Olivia provided a place for the missionaries to stay and allowed meetings to be held in their home. On Sunday, April 9th, 1882, Elder Metcalf recorded: 
"Held Meeting at Bro. Ganus's had a nice tournout, had a good flow of the Spirit of God this is the first Meeting held in this neighborhood hope to do some good, stayed all night at G's." [sic]
John and his extended family continued to help the missionaries and turned to them in their time of need. 

On the 13th of April of 1882, Elder Metcalf recorded that he was needed at John and Olivia's son, John Thackason and his wife, Mary Ganus's house. Elder Metcalf recorded:
"Called up to go to Sis Mary Ganus and Administered to her baby who was very sick the Lord releaved it from pain We also Blessed & Named it at the same time. But it gradually got worse till death which occured at 5 P.M.we also Blessed another of thier children stayed all night at Bro John Ganus."
When President John Morgan, the Mission President for the Southern States Mission visited the area, he too stayed with John and Olivia. Known for his service in the Union Army, President Morgan was considered an even greater problem to those opposed the Mormon religion and consequently, there was an even greater risk for those who housed him. During his time in the South, President Morgan received many threats from the Klu Klux Klan, which included both verbal threats and the posting of written signs on trees and in other locations. One particular sign, read "A Charitable hint to Mormons" and portrayed a man being hung.(2)  

John and Olivia's willingness to help the missionaries shows strength in the face of danger and implies a commitment to their beliefs. Would it become too much, or would they stay true to what they believed in the face of such danger? 



1.  "The Life and Ministry of John Morgan" by Arthur Richardson, Historical Research Nicholas G. Morgan Sr. pg. 234 

2. Ibid, p. 191 

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2017, All rights reserved

Friday, August 4, 2017

Is Your Ancestor Listed Here?A Great New Resource

I wanted to take a break in the story about John Ganus long enough to tell you about a website I've become aware of. It is a collection of some different and unique information.

I've long been aware of Ray Gurganus' webpage. I am a Ganus/Gurganus after all and he's spent year creating a website that brings together information about the Ganus and Gurganus families and the families who married into them. But recently Ray has taken on a new project----and this project has a scope that extends way beyond the Gurganus families and may even include in YOUR family.

So what is this new project? It all began when Ray found a list of a little over fifty pastors of his home church in North Carolina and became curious. He wondered where were these pastors before they came to his church and where did they move when they left? There was no one place to look for such information and he found himself googling and winding his way through the massive world wide web trying to find out more about them, which was extremely time-consuming. So Ray began to record what he found for future reference, but he didn't stop there.

Now, over 40,000 minister records later, Ray's list has grown to include not only ministers but many other occupations from many states and his collection is still growing.  Lucky for us, Ray has made his findings available to everyone---for free. Not only does he have an extensive listing of links to information about ministers, but his list now includes post masters, justice of the peace, treasurers, judges, university professors and even lighthouse keepers, in addition to others and the list just keeps growing! At the time of this post, Ray site lists over 78, 000 records and it is still growing.

You can search his database by occupation, surname and/or state:

https://www.ourfamtree.org/records/

I decided to give his site a spin and I was amazed by the links and information provided. For example, I entered one of my surnames, Rainwater and it brought up two ministers by that name. For Roland Rainwater, it shows that he served at the Mt Zion Methodist Church in Currituck County, NC in 1944. A link next to his name takes me to a page that shows me who else has served as a minister at that church and what years they were there. Another link takes me to a 54-page history of the Mt. Zion Methodist Church. J. Rainwater also popped up in the search and he served in Goucher Baptist Church in Spartanburg Co. in 1836 and the result also includes a link to other ministers for that church as well as a brief history of that church.

We can search using as much or as little information as we would like. For example, a search for simply "Georgia" revealed the current list of 738 records for individuals with a variety of occupations.

Do you wonder who the minister was for your ancestor's church?  A quick search in Georgia records brought up ministers for some of the churches where my ancestors attended church.

Can't find someone you think should be there? If you are aware of a list, Ray would love for you to submit that information to him so that it can be included. And although it's already a massive project, the list is still growing, so check back often.


Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2017, All rights reserved