Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Cloudy Night Rainwater--Really?

Cloudy Night Rainwater. How could you run across such a name in your lineage and not be curious? Initially, I wondered if it really was his name. Did his parents believe that the name Rainwater was Native American? Why would they choose a name like Cloudy Night, with or without the last name of Rainwater? 

Although the true origins of the Rainwater name are unknown, there are many theories. Different Rainwater families suggest the name is everything from Cherokee to Jewish in origin. Susan Chance-Rainwater shares some of the various theories on her website "The Rainwater Collection."  

Cloudy Night Rainwater was born September 1894 in Arkansas and was the son of Homer Cloud Rainwater and Pearl Rivers McCracken. Cloudy Night Rainwater was my fourth cousin, once removed. 

I  was thrilled to find not only a short little story about Cloudy Night in a newspaper but a sketch of him as well. 


Cloudy Night Rainwater, Rainwater family, Arkansas, Homer Cloud Rainwater, Pearl Rivers McCracken, genealogy, ancestry, ancestor, research, newspaper

The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana)
23 Jul 1899, Sun Page 28 

"Cloudy Night Rainwater, whose picture you see here is the 4-year-old son of Dr. H. Cloud Rainwater and Pearl Rivers McCracken, the favorite niece of the late Mrs. Nicholson (Pearl Rivers), proprietor of the Picayune. Cloudy Night is a fine boy and like his grandfather, he is a great practical joker. One day, not long ago he called to one of his little playmates, "Hello! don't you want some rock candy?" at the same time holding out a tempting-looking morsel. The other little boy took it eagerly and put it into his mouth; but he quickly spit it out again. It was salt! Cloudy Night knows his letters already, and wants very much to learn to read, so that he can read Lilliput Land for himself. "
Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2015, All rights reserved


Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Grandma at the Academy


Frank Soule, San Luis Stake Academy, ancestry, genealogy, family history, Sanford Colorado , Hazel Mickelsen Ganus, Manassa Colorado
San Luis Stake Academy abt 1900
Alamosa Public Library 
Initially, as I perused the meager contents of Grandma Hazel (Mickelsen) Ganus' little suitcase, I was somewhat disappointed that it had little to aid me in my efforts to take my Ganus family line back any further. Recently I revisited that little suitcase with an eye for what it does have instead of what it does not have and discovered that a few items give me a glimpse into my Grandma Hazel Mickelsen Ganus's life.

Among the items in the suitcase was a rather large certificate measuring 14" x 17" issued for completion of the high school course of study at the San Luis Stake Academy. I assumed that it was a school there in the San Luis Valley of Southern Colorado, but I didn't know much about it, so I did a little digging to see what I could learn about the high school that Grandma attended.

I learned from an article in the LDS Church News entitled "Academy era short-lived, but impact long lasting," written by Kevin Stoker in 1988, that from 1888 to 1909, the LDS church started 35 academies in Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Arizona, Mexico, and Canada. These schools provided spiritual education as well as secular. The San Luis Academy that my grandma attended began in 1909, but by 1922 the academies were closed and the education process was turned over to the local government.

Grandma did not write very much about her time at the academy but rather focused more on her education afterward. But here is what she did share about her experience:
"My eighth grade teacher, as well as my first two years of high school was Mr. Frank Soule, a very good teacher and a well liked person. In our graduating class there were (no number indicated). Our colors were purple and gold. Sanford only had a two year high school at that time. Students wanting to attend further had to go somewhere else. Of all that big graduating class very few went on to high school and less to college. I was the only girl that finished college of the group. While attending class high school in Sanford the school building caught on fire and burned down, we then attended class in the old church house.  
"After finishing my two years here I attended school in Manassa where there was a church school, called the San Luis Academy. The first year a bad epidemic of small pox broke out among the students as well as town people, so school was closed, consequently no credits were issued. I went back the next year and it was here that I finished my high school education. Luckily, while I was attending school in Sanford, I was able to carry sufficient credits, added to what I now had I was able to graduate in three years with the class of 1919.    
"How did we get to Manassa to school? Well, we rode in a bus, a lot like the ones we have now, but smaller."
Grandma pursued more education and eventually graduated from college and taught elementary school both in Colorado and Oklahoma where they moved in the later years of my grandfather's life. I have to appreciate her determination to learn and gain an education.
San Luis Stake Academy, Hazel Mickelsen Ganus, William O. Crowther, Wallace F.  Bennett, Sanford Colorado, Manassa Colorado, Genealogy LDS Church Academies

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2016, All rights reserved

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Gobble Gobble---Raising Turkeys

raising turkeys, Ganus, genealogy, ancestry, ancestors, family historyRecently I learned, much to my surprise, that Grandma Hazel (Mickelsen) Ganus raised turkeys at one point in her life. Although she never talked about it, she shared this fact in her life history. What started out as a relatively small project soon grew to become a large adventure and served to help my Grandpa and Grandma through a rough time.

 When Grandpa took a job working with Heiselt Construction on the Echo Canyon Dam in Utah, initially Grandma Ganus and their two children stayed in Colorado. Later, when the work took Grandpa to California, Grandma and their kids joined him and they lived near Lake Almanor. For a while, the work with Heiselt put food on the table and provided a roof overhead, but eventually the job was completed and Grandma and Grandpa, along with the Malmgren family, moved a short distance away just outside the small town of Taylorsville, California. There they lived on a ranch that Mr. Heiselt owned. The business had had financial difficulties and my grandparents were owed several thousand dollars, so they held out hope that they would eventually be paid all that was owed. Grandma recorded that while living on Heiselt's property, they lived in a small house on "the terrace." During that time,  Grandpa farmed and Grandma raised turkeys. According to her life history, she hatched the turkeys from eggs and she began with just three gobblers and twenty-five hens. Over time her little business grew and she raised 500 turkeys. Grandma indicated that she sold the turkeys to meat markets and that she got a good price for them.

I wish Grandma had written a little more. How in the world did she care for the turkeys? How did she know how to raise turkeys? Where did she go to get their food and how did she get there?  How did she transport them to the market? I would imagine there were some challenges in raising turkeys and that some of her experiences probably evoked a laugh or two. I wish so much that she had recorded some of the things that happened during that time.


Eventually, Grandma and Grandpa decided to leave their little place on the ranch and they returned to Sanford, Colorado where their families were living.

I will be thinking of her as we eat our Thanksgiving turkey this year. I am glad that Grandma took the time to write a little about her business and although I won't likely be raising turkeys anytime soon, I do hope I can be as determined as she was in coming up with creative solutions to the challenges I face in life.

Did your grandparents face hard times? How did they get through them?

Copyright © Michelle G. Taggart 2016, All rights reserved